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Kaitags are a rare form of embroidery from Kaitag, a Dargin inhabited region of Dagestan. There are only 600 known Kaitag pieces in the world. They were made for ceremonies such as births and weddings as a form of protection from the ‘evil eye’.

Kaitags are a rare form of embroidery from Kaitag, a Dargin inhabited region of Dagestan. There are only 600 known Kaitag pieces in the world. They were made for ceremonies such as births and weddings as a form of protection from the ‘evil eye’.

Kaitag . They are known for the unique type embroideries which they have produced, using silk threads on a hand woven cotton fabric. Designs appear to be derived from Ottoman sources and from motifs found on local tombstones.

Kaitags are a rare form of embroidery from Kaitag, a Dargin inhabited region of Dagestan. There are only 600 known Kaitag pieces in the world. They were made for ceremonies such as births and weddings as a form of protection from the ‘evil eye’.

Kaitags are a rare form of embroidery from Kaitag, a Dargin inhabited region of Dagestan. There are only 600 known Kaitag pieces in the world. They were made for ceremonies such as births and weddings as a form of protection from the ‘evil eye’.

Kaitags are a rare form of embroidery from Kaitag, a Dargin inhabited region of Dagestan. There are only 600 known Kaitag pieces in the world. They were made for ceremonies such as births and weddings as a form of protection from the ‘evil eye’.

Kaitags are a rare form of embroidery from Kaitag, a Dargin inhabited region of Dagestan. There are only 600 known Kaitag pieces in the world. They were made for ceremonies such as births and weddings as a form of protection from the ‘evil eye’.

Kanga Patterns - Kanga is a piece of printed cotton fabric worn by women and men throughout eastern and central Africa. A colourful garment, one of the Kanga's longer edges often features messages or quotations written in KiSwahili and sometimes in Arabic.

An Azerbaijan silk embroidery, South Caucasus worked in satin stitch and running stitch approximately 4ft. by 3ft. (1.22 by 0.91m.) early 18th century