Explore Had To, Batman and more!

Explore related topics

During the war the persistence of class hierarchies meant that some men had to perform tasks that were traditionally considered to be women's work. These men were known as "batmen."

During the war the persistence of class hierarchies meant that some men had to perform tasks that were traditionally considered to be women's work. These men were known as "batmen."

WW1 Christmas Eve, 1914, not a shot was fired, as British and German soldiers played football and handed out drinks, cigars and souvenirs. It was possibly the most poignant moment of the Great War and for several days afterwards the two sides appeared reluctant to fire on the men they had met face to face. Will we ever learn from history the futility of war? British/German

WW1 Christmas Eve, 1914, not a shot was fired, as British and German soldiers played football and handed out drinks, cigars and souvenirs. It was possibly the most poignant moment of the Great War and for several days afterwards the two sides appeared reluctant to fire on the men they had met face to face. Will we ever learn from history the futility of war? British/German

WWI, French Red Cross dog with gas mask, 1917 - Dogs had a vital part to play in World War One as the complexes of trenches spread throughout the Western Front. Dogs were used as messengers and proved to be as reliable as soldiers in the dangerous job of running messages. A trained dog was faster than a human runner, presented less of a target to a sniper and could travel over any terrain.

WWI, French Red Cross dog with gas mask, 1917 - Dogs had a vital part to play in World War One as the complexes of trenches spread throughout the Western Front. Dogs were used as messengers and proved to be as reliable as soldiers in the dangerous job of running messages. A trained dog was faster than a human runner, presented less of a target to a sniper and could travel over any terrain.

WWI, 26 April 1917; "Americans had given names to the 4 guns on the Mongolia" - Evening Public Ledger, Philadelphia

WWI, 26 April 1917; "Americans had given names to the 4 guns on the Mongolia" - Evening Public Ledger, Philadelphia

WW1. The Trench of the Bayonets. After the war this trench was found where about 20 French soldiers had been buried alive by shell bursts, leaving the muzzles of their rifles sticking up through the earth, their bodies underneath. An American built a monument to preserve the eerie scene, which is still visible at the battlefield of Verdun today. Source delcampe.net.

WW1. The Trench of the Bayonets. After the war this trench was found where about 20 French soldiers had been buried alive by shell bursts, leaving the muzzles of their rifles sticking up through the earth, their bodies underneath. An American built a monument to preserve the eerie scene, which is still visible at the battlefield of Verdun today. Source delcampe.net.

This image from World War I shows mules transporting aerial torpedoes through the Argonne Forest in France. They are being led by French troops.  Mules along with horses were vital on the Western Front. They had extraordinary stamina even in severe weather conditions. They were often the only means of getting supplies to the front and getting guns and torpedoes moved from place to place through difficult terrain.

This image from World War I shows mules transporting aerial torpedoes through the Argonne Forest in France. They are being led by French troops. Mules along with horses were vital on the Western Front. They had extraordinary stamina even in severe weather conditions. They were often the only means of getting supplies to the front and getting guns and torpedoes moved from place to place through difficult terrain.

WW1: Officers of the Indian Army on leave from the Western front, visit the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace. December 1915. Indian infantry had been already withdrawn from the Western Front by the end of 1915. Climatic conditions, heavy casualties, and the death of the majority of English officers commanding Indian troops led the British HQ to wisely withdraw Indian foot units to more suitable areas of deployment.

WW1: Officers of the Indian Army on leave from the Western front, visit the Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace. December 1915. Indian infantry had been already withdrawn from the Western Front by the end of 1915. Climatic conditions, heavy casualties, and the death of the majority of English officers commanding Indian troops led the British HQ to wisely withdraw Indian foot units to more suitable areas of deployment.

12 amazing WW1 facts that you probably don't know:  World War One often conjures up images of a horrific bloodbath fought in the trenches of the Western Front. While this certainly captures some of the reality, did you know that the war spread as far as China? Or that it was fought by servicemen from Asia, North America, the Caribbean, Australasia and Africa?  Here are 12 surprising facts about World War One PIC: Secret Tunnelers of WW1

12 amazing WW1 facts

12 amazing WW1 facts that you probably don't know: World War One often conjures up images of a horrific bloodbath fought in the trenches of the Western Front. While this certainly captures some of the reality, did you know that the war spread as far as China? Or that it was fought by servicemen from Asia, North America, the Caribbean, Australasia and Africa? Here are 12 surprising facts about World War One PIC: Secret Tunnelers of WW1

Two US soldiers pose with a trophy Long Luger pistol somewhere on the Western Front, WW1. The Luger was already famous as a robust, technically advanced handgun. Its complicated design, however, never allowed its truly mass production. Luger production continued up until the beginning of WW2. By then, the Luger had achieved enough fame to become a hotly pursued trophy by Allied soldiers.

Two US soldiers pose with a trophy Long Luger pistol somewhere on the Western Front, WW1. The Luger was already famous as a robust, technically advanced handgun. Its complicated design, however, never allowed its truly mass production. Luger production continued up until the beginning of WW2. By then, the Luger had achieved enough fame to become a hotly pursued trophy by Allied soldiers.

Pinterest
Search