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Explore Ambassador Babak, Photo Ambassador and more!

Take a cruise across our cold galaxy and witness the birthplace of stars

The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) telescope is one of the tools used by European Southern Observatory to peer beyond the realm of visible light. Clusters of white penitentes -- thin spikes of hardened snow or ice -- can be seen in the foreground. Photo by ESO Photo Ambassador Babak Tafreshi

King of the Cosmos - This image transports you to the most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory in the world: the Very Large Telescope (VLT), located at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. More information: http://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1626a/ Credit: P. Horálek/ESO

Strong Space Weather Could Send Auroras to the U.S. Tonight

ESO Photo Ambassador Babak Tafreshi snapped this remarkable image of the antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, set against the splendor of the Milky Way.

Babak Tafreshi, one of the ESO Photo Ambassadors, has captured a curious phenomenon on the Chajnantor plateau, the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array (ALMA). These bizarre ice and snow formations are known as penitentes (Spanish for “penitents”). They are illuminated by the light of the Moon, which is visible on the right on the photograph. On the left, higher in the sky, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds can be faintly seen. Credit: ESO/B. Tafreshi (twanight.org)

ESO Photo Ambassador, Babak Tafreshi has taken another outstanding panoramic photograph of ESO’s Paranal Observatory. In the foreground is the dramatic, mountainous landscape of the Atacama Desert. On the left, on the highest peak, is the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), and in front of it, on a slightly lower peak, is the VISTA telescope (Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy).

What causes these spooky ice formations in the desert?

What causes these spooky ice formations in the desert? http://io9.com/what-causes-these-spooky-ice-formations-in-the-desert-1493729077

First pictures from the £1bn 'time machine telescope' reveal faraway galaxy forming stars at 'breathtaking rate'

Babak Tafreshi, one of the ESO Photo Ambassadors, has captured the antennas of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) under the southern sky in another breathtaking image

Antennas of the Atacama Large millimeter/submillimeter Array. This shows the constellations of Carina (The Keel), Vela (The Sails), and the Milky Way. The bright orange star is Suhail in Vela, the similarly orange star in the upper middle is Avior, in Carina. Of the three bright blue stars that form an “L” near these stars, the left two belong to Vela, and the right one to Carina. And exactly in the centre of the image below these stars gleams the pink glow of the Carina Nebula (eso1208),"

This panoramic view of the Chajnantor Plateau shows the site of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), taken from near the peak of Cerro Chico. Babak Tafreshi, an ESO Photo Ambassador, has succeeded in capturing the feeling of solitude experienced at the ALMA site, 5000 metres above sea level in the Chilean #Andes. Light and shadow paint the #landscape, enhancing the otherworldly appearance of the terrain. In the foreground of the image, clustered #ALMA #antennas look like…