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Crinoid fossils. Rock containing crinoid (or sea lily) fossils. These are Scyphocrinus elegans crinoids from the Silurian/Devonian period (about 440-360 million years ago). Crinoids are marine echinoderms that appear as early as the Ordovician period (500 million years ago). These crinoids have stalks by which they would attach themselves to the seabed, capturing food with feathery arms that formed a cup (seen at lower right and upper centre). Thousands of extinct crinoid species have been…

Crinoid fossils. Rock containing crinoid (or sea lily) fossils. These are Scyphocrinus elegans crinoids from the Silurian/Devonian period (about 440-360 million years ago). Crinoids are marine echinoderms that appear as early as the Ordovician period (500 million years ago). These crinoids have stalks by which they would attach themselves to the seabed, capturing food with feathery arms that formed a cup (seen at lower right and upper centre). Thousands of extinct crinoid species have been…

Fossil sea star (Eoactis stachi), Late Silurian (c. 420 million years old), Melbourne, Victoria  Photographer: Rodney Start. Source: Museum Victoria.

Fossil sea star (Eoactis stachi), Late Silurian (c. 420 million years old), Melbourne, Victoria Photographer: Rodney Start. Source: Museum Victoria.

✒ Louisville Fossils ✒ Kentuckiana Mike says, "I am an amateur paleontologist who studies marine invertebrate fossils in the Louisville, Kentucky area. We have fossils from the Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian and Mississippian (Carboniferous) Periods of the Paleozoic era." I fell over this when researching a pin for my "Stone in my Shoe" board.

✒ Louisville Fossils ✒ Kentuckiana Mike says, "I am an amateur paleontologist who studies marine invertebrate fossils in the Louisville, Kentucky area. We have fossils from the Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian and Mississippian (Carboniferous) Periods of the Paleozoic era." I fell over this when researching a pin for my "Stone in my Shoe" board.

Halysite (Chain Coral) fossil! Extinct. Scientists say it's from the Silurian period, atleast 416 million years old. (Most creationists like myself would beg to differ, but let's just say this lil guy is OLD.) Found one JUST like this on the shores of Lake Michigan! :)

Halysite (Chain Coral) fossil! Extinct. Scientists say it's from the Silurian period, atleast 416 million years old. (Most creationists like myself would beg to differ, but let's just say this lil guy is OLD.) Found one JUST like this on the shores of Lake Michigan! :)

The sea scorpion a prehistoric species of scorpion that excited around 350 million years ago. There's creatures would prazomably crush there pray with there claws. There stinger although looks intimidating probably had little to no venom in it.

The sea scorpion a prehistoric species of scorpion that excited around 350 million years ago. There's creatures would prazomably crush there pray with there claws. There stinger although looks intimidating probably had little to no venom in it.

Waptia fieldensis is an extinct species of arthropod from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Lagerstätte of Canada. It grew to a length of about 8 cm and resembled modern shrimp in both morphology and habit.

Waptia fieldensis is an extinct species of arthropod from the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Lagerstätte of Canada. It grew to a length of about 8 cm and resembled modern shrimp in both morphology and habit.

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