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Tank Trap - This elaborate concrete trap was erected by German defenders in Pronville, France to stop Allied tanks. The steel bars prevented tanks from coming over the wall. There were few of these traps on the Western Front. The Germans usually relied on field guns firing over open sights to stop advancing armour. The guns were generally effective, but this left them dangerously close to the front and therefore vulnerable to attacking infantry.

Tank Trap - This elaborate concrete trap was erected by German defenders in Pronville, France to stop Allied tanks. The steel bars prevented tanks from coming over the wall. There were few of these traps on the Western Front. The Germans usually relied on field guns firing over open sights to stop advancing armour. The guns were generally effective, but this left them dangerously close to the front and therefore vulnerable to attacking infantry.

WW1: German troops have deployed a heavy machine gun as an anti-aircraft gun in a corner of their trench.

WW1: German troops have deployed a heavy machine gun as an anti-aircraft gun in a corner of their trench.

German Trenches, World War I

World War I in Photos: Global Conflict

German Trenches, World War I

Resting in a Shell Hole - Exhausted Canadians rest in a shell hole during the Battle of Amiens in 1918. These six infantry soldiers must be far from the front lines as several soldiers are sitting dangerously exposed.

Resting in a Shell Hole - Exhausted Canadians rest in a shell hole during the Battle of Amiens in 1918. These six infantry soldiers must be far from the front lines as several soldiers are sitting dangerously exposed.

60-Pounders in Action - A 60-pounder in use during the Battle of Amiens in 1918. The opening day of the Amiens battle was an enormous success, but the deep advance of 12 kilometres forced the artillery to move forward to keep up with the infantry. In attempting to keep up with the infantry, these gunners have not had time to dig-in and are left dangerously exposed should the enemy begin to use high explosive or shrapnel fire.

60-Pounders in Action - A 60-pounder in use during the Battle of Amiens in 1918. The opening day of the Amiens battle was an enormous success, but the deep advance of 12 kilometres forced the artillery to move forward to keep up with the infantry. In attempting to keep up with the infantry, these gunners have not had time to dig-in and are left dangerously exposed should the enemy begin to use high explosive or shrapnel fire.

GERMAN TANK

GERMAN TANK

A Mark IV (Male) tank H45 'Hyacinth' of H Battalion ditched in a German trench while supporting the 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, one mile west of Ribecourt. Some men of the battalion are resting in the trench, 20 November 1917. Commanded by 2nd Lt. Jackson, H Btn, 24 Coy, 10 Sec. During the attack it reached the first objective of the day, The Hindenburg Line, before falling in the ditch. (additional info from John Winner) (Photo source - © IWM Q 6433) Photographer - Lt. John…

A Mark IV (Male) tank H45 'Hyacinth' of H Battalion ditched in a German trench while supporting the 1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, one mile west of Ribecourt. Some men of the battalion are resting in the trench, 20 November 1917. Commanded by 2nd Lt. Jackson, H Btn, 24 Coy, 10 Sec. During the attack it reached the first objective of the day, The Hindenburg Line, before falling in the ditch. (additional info from John Winner) (Photo source - © IWM Q 6433) Photographer - Lt. John…

France, c. 1916The 9th British Lancers charging German artillery in WWI.

British Lancers Charging

France, c. 1916The 9th British Lancers charging German artillery in WWI.

The Renault FT 17 was the only ww1 tank being able to operate on messy terrain.

The Renault FT 17 was the only ww1 tank being able to operate on messy terrain.

historywars: The British Mk.II (Male) tank ‘Lusitania’ of 9 Co. ‘C’ Battalion at Arras, Nord-Pas-de-Calais.

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