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FUCK America! - NY Lawyer, Ikiesha Al-Shabazz Whittaker

FUCK America! - NY Lawyer, Ikiesha Al-Shabazz Whittaker

Charlotte E. Ray was the first female African American lawyer, and also the first woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court.

Charlotte E. Ray was the first female African American lawyer, and also the first woman to argue a case in front of the Supreme Court.

When I was younger I would always say I wanted to be a lawyer, always aspired to…

When I was younger I would always say I wanted to be a lawyer, always aspired to…

This post originally appeared on The Cut. By Lindsay Peoples  In the '60s and '70s, the civil-rights movement and feminism didn't always see eye to eye, but Gloria Steinem and the lawyer and black-...

Bridging The Gap Between Black And White Feminism

This post originally appeared on The Cut. By Lindsay Peoples In the '60s and '70s, the civil-rights movement and feminism didn't always see eye to eye, but Gloria Steinem and the lawyer and black-...

Florynce Kennedy, civil rights lawyer, feminist, political activist, eccentric, New York, August 1, 1969; Photograph by Richard Avedon.  In the 1970s Kennedy traveled the lecture circuit with writer Gloria Steinem. If a man asked the pair if they were lesbians — a stereotype of feminists at the time — Flo would quote TiGrace Atkinson and answer, "Are you my alternative?"  In 1974, People magazine wrote that she was "The biggest, loudest and, indisputably, the rudest mouth on the…

Florynce Kennedy, civil rights lawyer, feminist, political activist, eccentric, New York, August 1, 1969; Photograph by Richard Avedon. In the 1970s Kennedy traveled the lecture circuit with writer Gloria Steinem. If a man asked the pair if they were lesbians — a stereotype of feminists at the time — Flo would quote TiGrace Atkinson and answer, "Are you my alternative?" In 1974, People magazine wrote that she was "The biggest, loudest and, indisputably, the rudest mouth on the…

there needs to be justice for this little girl...this breaks my heart

there needs to be justice for this little girl...this breaks my heart

BLACK FIRST Flashback: 63 years ago today, (August 24th)  Edith Spurlock Sampson (pictured on the right with Eleanor Roosevelt), became the first Black US Delegate appointed by Harry S. Truman in 1950.  A lifelong achiever, she was a lawyer, judge and first woman to receive her Masters Degree from Loyola University.

BLACK FIRST Flashback: 63 years ago today, (August 24th) Edith Spurlock Sampson (pictured on the right with Eleanor Roosevelt), became the first Black US Delegate appointed by Harry S. Truman in 1950. A lifelong achiever, she was a lawyer, judge and first woman to receive her Masters Degree from Loyola University.

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