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Open wide! Peer inside the mouth of a humpback whale. Worth noting are the large baleen plates which are used for filter-feeding. The whale sucks up large amounts of water into its mouth, and then pushes it back out through the baleen, trapping krill and fish inside for eating.   #wildlife #naturelovers #waterwednesday

Open wide! Peer inside the mouth of a humpback whale. Worth noting are the large baleen plates which are used for filter-feeding. The whale sucks up large amounts of water into its mouth, and then pushes it back out through the baleen, trapping krill and fish inside for eating. #wildlife #naturelovers #waterwednesday

False Killer Whale with a Killer Smile https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeth4NQ0ff0

False Killer Whale Sidles Up To Boat, Flashes Goofy Grin

False Killer Whale with a Killer Smile https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeth4NQ0ff0

Most cetaceans (whales and dolphins) have seven fused vertebrae. This is not the case for the beluga whale, whose vertebrae are not fused. This allows the whale to move its head about freely - up, down, and side to side - without having to rotate its body. This gives the creature an improved field of vision over most other marine mammals, which comes in handy when hunting for prey, or avoiding predators.

Most cetaceans (whales and dolphins) have seven fused vertebrae. This is not the case for the beluga whale, whose vertebrae are not fused. This allows the whale to move its head about freely - up, down, and side to side - without having to rotate its body. This gives the creature an improved field of vision over most other marine mammals, which comes in handy when hunting for prey, or avoiding predators.

Still Think Humans are the Most Intelligent Animals? Here's Why Whales and Dolphins Have us Beat

Still Think Humans are the Most Intelligent Animals? Here’s Why Whales and Dolphins Have us Beat

Still Think Humans are the Most Intelligent Animals? Here's Why Whales and Dolphins Have us Beat

These are the last of the UK’s resident orca population | Love Nature

These are the last of the UK’s resident orca population | Love Nature

8a09567b41ed8cd1b569eafb69510618.jpg 500×4.917 pixels

8a09567b41ed8cd1b569eafb69510618.jpg 500×4.917 pixels

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