Explore Graces Louvre, Copy 2nd and more!

Explore related topics

This is my own picture posted to Flickr.  The Three Graces, Louvre Museum, Roman copy , 2nd century CE.

This is my own picture posted to Flickr. The Three Graces, Louvre Museum, Roman copy , 2nd century CE.

The ancient Roman marble Sarcophagus of the Muses; it depicts the nine Muses, each with her symbolic attribute; l to r: Calliope (epic poetry), a scroll; Thalia (comedy), a comic mask; Terpsichore, dance; Euterpe ( lyric poetry), a double flute; Polymnia (hymnody), a rock; Clio (history), a writing-tablet; Erato ( love poetry), a cithara; Urania (astronomy), a globe; Melpomene (tragedy), a tragic mask. (The Louvre Museum)

The ancient Roman marble Sarcophagus of the Muses; it depicts the nine Muses, each with her symbolic attribute; l to r: Calliope (epic poetry), a scroll; Thalia (comedy), a comic mask; Terpsichore, dance; Euterpe ( lyric poetry), a double flute; Polymnia (hymnody), a rock; Clio (history), a writing-tablet; Erato ( love poetry), a cithara; Urania (astronomy), a globe; Melpomene (tragedy), a tragic mask. (The Louvre Museum)

In Greek mythology, Scylla (Greek: Σκύλλα, Skylla, pronounced [skýl̚la]) was a monster that lived on one side of a narrow channel of water, opposite its counterpart Charybdis. The two sides of the strait were within an arrow's range of each other—so close that sailors attempting to avoid Charybdis would pass too close to Scylla and vice versa.

In Greek mythology, Scylla (Greek: Σκύλλα, Skylla, pronounced [skýl̚la]) was a monster that lived on one side of a narrow channel of water, opposite its counterpart Charybdis. The two sides of the strait were within an arrow's range of each other—so close that sailors attempting to avoid Charybdis would pass too close to Scylla and vice versa.

“Ghetto Tarot” produced by Haitian artist collective Atis Rezistans and photographer Alice Smeets.

“Ghetto Tarot” produced by Haitian artist

Pinterest
Search