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Frances Burney (13 June 1752 – 6 January 1840), also known as Fanny Burney and after her marriage as Madame d'Arblay, was an English novelist, diarist and playwright. She was born in Lynn Regis, now King's Lynn, England, on 13 June 1752, to musical historian Dr Charles Burney (1726–1814) and Esther Sleepe Burney (1725–1762).

Frances Burney (13 June 1752 – 6 January 1840), also known as Fanny Burney and after her marriage as Madame d'Arblay, was an English novelist, diarist and playwright. She was born in Lynn Regis, now King's Lynn, England, on 13 June 1752, to musical historian Dr Charles Burney (1726–1814) and Esther Sleepe Burney (1725–1762).

Portrait of future wife of General Alexandre d'Arblay (she married this French emigre only in 1793), Frances, alias 'Fanny' Burney (1752-1840), British writer, by her brother.

Portrait of future wife of General Alexandre d'Arblay (she married this French emigre only in 1793), Frances, alias 'Fanny' Burney (1752-1840), British writer, by her brother.

Frances (Fanny) Burney. 1752-1840.   Wrote four novels, eight plays, and over 20 journal volumes. Her family disapproved of her "unladylike" writing, so she worked in the night, when no one knew she was awake. After her marriage, it was Burney's very successful writing that fed (and housed) her family. Also wrote a first-hand account of her own mastectomy.

Frances (Fanny) Burney. 1752-1840. Wrote four novels, eight plays, and over 20 journal volumes. Her family disapproved of her "unladylike" writing, so she worked in the night, when no one knew she was awake. After her marriage, it was Burney's very successful writing that fed (and housed) her family. Also wrote a first-hand account of her own mastectomy.

Fanny Burney, (known after her marriage, as Madame d’Arblay), was an18thC English novelist, diarist and playwright.

Fanny Burney, (known after her marriage, as Madame d’Arblay), was an18thC English novelist, diarist and playwright.

Freda Frostbite's Place: From The Virtual Diary of Fanny Burney -- Fanny in France

Freda Frostbite's Place: From The Virtual Diary of Fanny Burney -- Fanny in France

"Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a bold, salacious, and pioneering individual. If Frances Burney made women writers respectable, it was Aphra Behn who put them on the map." Kate O'Connor http://writersinspire.org/content/aphra-behn

"Aphra Behn (1640-1689) was a bold, salacious, and pioneering individual. If Frances Burney made women writers respectable, it was Aphra Behn who put them on the map." Kate O'Connor http://writersinspire.org/content/aphra-behn

Frances d'Arblay (Fanny Burney) by Edward Francisco Burney, 1784

Frances d'Arblay (Fanny Burney) by Edward Francisco Burney, 1784

"The dreadful steel": A Terrible Surgery for Frances Burney Frances Burney (aka Fanny Burney, Madame d'Arblay; Lynn Regis, Norfolk, (now King's Lynn), England, 13th June 1752 – Bath, Somerset, England, 6th January 1840), via Madame Gilflurt. Frances d'Arblay (Fanny Burney) by Edward Francisco Burney, 1784

"The dreadful steel": A Terrible Surgery for Frances Burney Frances Burney (aka Fanny Burney, Madame d'Arblay; Lynn Regis, Norfolk, (now King's Lynn), England, 13th June 1752 – Bath, Somerset, England, 6th January 1840), via Madame Gilflurt. Frances d'Arblay (Fanny Burney) by Edward Francisco Burney, 1784

Frances 'Fanny' Burney (1752-1840), author of 'Evelina'

Frances 'Fanny' Burney (1752-1840), author of 'Evelina'

Cecilia, or Memoirs of an Heiress (Oxford World's Classics) by Frances Burney http://smile.amazon.com/dp/019955238X/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_ycQVvb075C8TY

Cecilia, or Memoirs of an Heiress (Oxford World's Classics) by Frances Burney http://smile.amazon.com/dp/019955238X/ref=cm_sw_r_pi_dp_ycQVvb075C8TY

Frances “Fanny” Burney was among the most influential authors of her era. Living at a time when it was considered very scandalous for women to indulge in writing fiction, she nevertheless published her groundbreaking novel Evelina in 1778. The book was very highly praised by contemporary society. As a critic once quipped, “It safe to say, that without Fanny Burney there would never have been a Jane Austen.”

Frances “Fanny” Burney was among the most influential authors of her era. Living at a time when it was considered very scandalous for women to indulge in writing fiction, she nevertheless published her groundbreaking novel Evelina in 1778. The book was very highly praised by contemporary society. As a critic once quipped, “It safe to say, that without Fanny Burney there would never have been a Jane Austen.”