P/O Douglas H "Grubby" Grice of 32 Squadron was shot down 3 times during 6 weeks of fighting in 1940. On 15 August, having already notched up 8 victories, an incendiary bullet flashed over his left wrist and into the instrument panel, piercing the fuel tank and setting the aircraft on fire. Falling out when his aircraft turned over, he spent a prolonged dip in the sea that aided the healing process of the burns he had suffered to the face and the wrists.

P/O Douglas H "Grubby" Grice of 32 Squadron was shot down 3 times during 6 weeks of fighting in 1940. On 15 August, having already notched up 8 victories, an incendiary bullet flashed over his left wrist and into the instrument panel, piercing the fuel tank and setting the aircraft on fire. Falling out when his aircraft turned over, he spent a prolonged dip in the sea that aided the healing process of the burns he had suffered to the face and the wrists.

P/O Douglas H Hone first saw action 13 days after joining No 615 Squadron RAF on 6 July 1940. The 22-year-old pilot was attacked by a Hurricane Mk I on 14 August and though his instruments were shot away he landed at at RAF Kenley. His glycol tank was damaged by return fire while engaging a Do 17 on 24 August, forcing him to land in a field at Meopham. He was wounded in the leg by cannon splinters 2 days later and flew again on 20 September.

P/O Douglas H Hone first saw action 13 days after joining No 615 Squadron RAF on 6 July 1940. The 22-year-old pilot was attacked by a Hurricane Mk I on 14 August and though his instruments were shot away he landed at at RAF Kenley. His glycol tank was damaged by return fire while engaging a Do 17 on 24 August, forcing him to land in a field at Meopham. He was wounded in the leg by cannon splinters 2 days later and flew again on 20 September.

On claiming a fighter 10m east of Deal at 20.10 on 9 July 1940 while leading A Flight of No 54 Squadron RAF, acting F/L Alan C "Al" Deere found himself on a collision course with Me 109E-3 White 2 flown by Ofw Johann Hans Illner of 4/JG51. Despite the propeller blades of Spitfire Mk I KL-B KIWI being bent, the engine disabled and much of the fin and rudder lost, the 22-year-old New Zealander glided back and force-landed in a paddock 5m from RAF Manston against a stone wall.

On claiming a fighter 10m east of Deal at 20.10 on 9 July 1940 while leading A Flight of No 54 Squadron RAF, acting F/L Alan C "Al" Deere found himself on a collision course with Me 109E-3 White 2 flown by Ofw Johann Hans Illner of 4/JG51. Despite the propeller blades of Spitfire Mk I KL-B KIWI being bent, the engine disabled and much of the fin and rudder lost, the 22-year-old New Zealander glided back and force-landed in a paddock 5m from RAF Manston against a stone wall.

F/O John R. Cock 87Sqn. - 11th August he shot down a Ju88 and a Me109 and probably shot down a Me110 and another Ju88. In this engagement Cock's Hurricane, V7233, was hit by a Me109 and he baled out, slightly wounded. He landed in the sea off Portland Bill, swam ashore at Chesil Beach and was admitted to hospital. 24th October, after his engine cut out, Cock was unable to avoid colliding with P/O D.T Jay. Cock managed to make a forced-landing but Jay was killed while attempting to bale out.

F/O John R. Cock 87Sqn. - 11th August he shot down a Ju88 and a Me109 and probably shot down a Me110 and another Ju88. In this engagement Cock's Hurricane, V7233, was hit by a Me109 and he baled out, slightly wounded. He landed in the sea off Portland Bill, swam ashore at Chesil Beach and was admitted to hospital. 24th October, after his engine cut out, Cock was unable to avoid colliding with P/O D.T Jay. Cock managed to make a forced-landing but Jay was killed while attempting to bale out.

John Charles Dundas, DFC & Bar (19 August 1915 – 28 November 1940) was a British Second World War fighter pilot. On 28 November 1940 Dundas is believed to have engaged and shot down Helmut Wick, the highest scoring ace of the Luftwaffe at that time, over the English Channel. Moments later Dundas was also shot down into the sea. Both pilots vanished and remain missing in action.  He had 12 aerial victories.

John Charles Dundas, DFC & Bar (19 August 1915 – 28 November 1940) was a British Second World War fighter pilot. On 28 November 1940 Dundas is believed to have engaged and shot down Helmut Wick, the highest scoring ace of the Luftwaffe at that time, over the English Channel. Moments later Dundas was also shot down into the sea. Both pilots vanished and remain missing in action. He had 12 aerial victories.

P/O Alexander G. Osmand 213Sqn - 11th August. "We ran into E/A at 15000. About sixty Ju87's, sixty Bf110's and several Bf109's. We went for the 110's. I got in a good head on burst at one, a long deflection shot at another, then lost the flight chasing a 109 into cloud." - The hydraulic system of his Hurricane, N2708, was damaged by return fire from a Ju88 engaged over Portland. He crashed on landing back at base. Two days later Osmand claimed a Bf109 destroyed

P/O Alexander G. Osmand 213Sqn - 11th August. "We ran into E/A at 15000. About sixty Ju87's, sixty Bf110's and several Bf109's. We went for the 110's. I got in a good head on burst at one, a long deflection shot at another, then lost the flight chasing a 109 into cloud." - The hydraulic system of his Hurricane, N2708, was damaged by return fire from a Ju88 engaged over Portland. He crashed on landing back at base. Two days later Osmand claimed a Bf109 destroyed

On 25 October 1940, acting F/L Charles BF "Brian" Kingcome was awarded the DFC, the citation attesting him leadership "with judgment, skill and keenness". During his time in command of No 92 Squadron RAF between 20 September and 2 October, the 23-year-old pilot often ignored the controller's instructions, instead gaining height by turning north before heading south. Pouncing in a vertical dive from head on often split up a portion of the bombers before the fighter escort could interfere.

On 25 October 1940, acting F/L Charles BF "Brian" Kingcome was awarded the DFC, the citation attesting him leadership "with judgment, skill and keenness". During his time in command of No 92 Squadron RAF between 20 September and 2 October, the 23-year-old pilot often ignored the controller's instructions, instead gaining height by turning north before heading south. Pouncing in a vertical dive from head on often split up a portion of the bombers before the fighter escort could interfere.

Four pilots of No 92 Squadron RAF based at Manston, Kent, pick through the wreckage of a Junkers Ju 87B, which they shot down while it was attempting to attack a convoy in the English Channel. The Squadron Commander, Squadron Leader J A Kent, who led the section, examines a fire extinguisher at far left.

Four pilots of No 92 Squadron RAF based at Manston, Kent, pick through the wreckage of a Junkers Ju 87B, which they shot down while it was attempting to attack a convoy in the English Channel. The Squadron Commander, Squadron Leader J A Kent, who led the section, examines a fire extinguisher at far left.

Sgt Leonard "Len" Davies of No 151 Squadron RAF was 19 when scrambled from RAF North Weald on 28 August 1940 and being badly mauled when becoming the likely victim of Maj Werner Mölders of Stab/JG51 near Canterbury at 17.25. Bleeding and soaked in fuel, he nursed Hurricane Mk I DZ-Y to RAF Eastchurch and landed while the runway was being bombed, ending up unconscious, hanging from his straps upside down in a crater with serious head and leg injuries.

Sgt Leonard "Len" Davies of No 151 Squadron RAF was 19 when scrambled from RAF North Weald on 28 August 1940 and being badly mauled when becoming the likely victim of Maj Werner Mölders of Stab/JG51 near Canterbury at 17.25. Bleeding and soaked in fuel, he nursed Hurricane Mk I DZ-Y to RAF Eastchurch and landed while the runway was being bombed, ending up unconscious, hanging from his straps upside down in a crater with serious head and leg injuries.

John Fraser Drummond DFC (19 October 1918 - 10 October 1940) was an RAF fighter pilot, who flew in the Battle of Britain.  Had 8.5 aerial victories before his death he collided with Pilot Officer Bill Williams. Drummond baled out but was too low for his parachute to open effectively before hitting the ground.

John Fraser Drummond DFC (19 October 1918 - 10 October 1940) was an RAF fighter pilot, who flew in the Battle of Britain. Had 8.5 aerial victories before his death he collided with Pilot Officer Bill Williams. Drummond baled out but was too low for his parachute to open effectively before hitting the ground.

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