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Epic poets of the Renaissance looked to emulate the poems of Greco-Roman antiquity, but doing so presented a dilemma: what to do about the gods? Divine intervention plays a major part in the…  read more at Kobo.

Epic poets of the Renaissance looked to emulate the poems of Greco-Roman antiquity, but doing so presented a dilemma: what to do about the gods? Divine intervention plays a major part in the… read more at Kobo.

This edited volume brings together a collection of provocative essays examining a number of different facets of Elizabethan foreign affairs, encompassing England and The British Isles, Europe, and the…  read more at Kobo.

This edited volume brings together a collection of provocative essays examining a number of different facets of Elizabethan foreign affairs, encompassing England and The British Isles, Europe, and the… read more at Kobo.

Recovering the oft-neglected role of women in Ottoman high society and power politics, this book brings to life the women who made their mark in a male domain. Though historical records tend to…  read more at Kobo.

Recovering the oft-neglected role of women in Ottoman high society and power politics, this book brings to life the women who made their mark in a male domain. Though historical records tend to… read more at Kobo.

In the closing years of the fourteenth century, an anonymous French writer compiled a book addressed to a fifteen-year-old bride, narrated in the voice of her husband, a wealthy, aging Parisian…  read more at Kobo.

In the closing years of the fourteenth century, an anonymous French writer compiled a book addressed to a fifteen-year-old bride, narrated in the voice of her husband, a wealthy, aging Parisian… read more at Kobo.

Zorba The Greek, a novel by Nikos Kazantzakis. Book designer unknown. First published in Faber in 1961. http://www.flickr.com/photos/23023719@N04/2238310905/in/photostream

Zorba The Greek, a novel by Nikos Kazantzakis. Book designer unknown. First published in Faber in 1961. http://www.flickr.com/photos/23023719@N04/2238310905/in/photostream