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Nearly all of the interviewers were white southerners and most of them were women. Far too often the tone and even the content of the interv...

Nearly all of the interviewers were white southerners and most of them were women. Far too often the tone and even the content of the interv...

Lady Sarah Forbes Bonetta, a ward of Queen Victoria, (her daughter Victoria was the god daughter of Queen Victoria) shortly after her arranged (by Queen VIctoria) marriage, with her new husband a rich merchant. She was always at court and was known for her intelligence and wit and spoke many languages. Her family were African royalty killed in a tribal slave war when she was a child. She was brought to Britain as a child to save her life,as she was also going to be executed. BIDDY CRAFT

Lady Sarah Forbes Bonetta, a ward of Queen Victoria, (her daughter Victoria was the god daughter of Queen Victoria) shortly after her arranged (by Queen VIctoria) marriage, with her new husband a rich merchant. She was always at court and was known for her intelligence and wit and spoke many languages. Her family were African royalty killed in a tribal slave war when she was a child. She was brought to Britain as a child to save her life,as she was also going to be executed. BIDDY CRAFT

Celia, A Slave, Trial (1855) For nineteen-year-old Celia, a Slave on a Missouri farm, five years of being repeatedly raped by her middle-aged owner was enough.  On the night of June 23, 1855, she would later tell a reporter, "the Devil got into me" and she fatally clubbed her master as he approached her in her cabin.  The murder trial of the slave Celia, raised questions about the rights of Slaves to fight back against the worst of Slavery's abuses.  Celia died on the gallows Dec. 21, 1855.

Celia, A Slave, Trial (1855) For nineteen-year-old Celia, a Slave on a Missouri farm, five years of being repeatedly raped by her middle-aged owner was enough. On the night of June 23, 1855, she would later tell a reporter, "the Devil got into me" and she fatally clubbed her master as he approached her in her cabin. The murder trial of the slave Celia, raised questions about the rights of Slaves to fight back against the worst of Slavery's abuses. Celia died on the gallows Dec. 21, 1855.

Photo: Aunt Lucy, Hermitage Plantation, AL  Courtesy Library of Congress American Memory Collection

Photo: Aunt Lucy, Hermitage Plantation, AL Courtesy Library of Congress American Memory Collection

A rare photograph of a group of women sitting on piles of cotton with two white male overseers. Entitled "Freedom on the Plantation" circa 1863-1866. Robin Stanford Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University.

A rare photograph of a group of women sitting on piles of cotton with two white male overseers. Entitled "Freedom on the Plantation" circa 1863-1866. Robin Stanford Collection, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University.

84 year old Mississippi Woman - This women was, by her own words, born two years before the surrender, in 1863. (Photographer:  Dorothea Lange)

84 Years Old

84 year old Mississippi Woman - This women was, by her own words, born two years before the surrender, in 1863. (Photographer: Dorothea Lange)

European settlers and enslaved Africans introduced Malaria and other tropical diseases to the Americas. These tropical diseases thrived in the swampy region of the Lowcountry. While many slaves were more resistant, the white planters were not. Therefore, whites moved their homes away from the rice fields and vacated the lowcountry at least during the humid season. For the Lowcountry Gullah, this isolation allowed for the creation and preservation of their distinct African culture.

Gullah Culture Thrived in Desolate Conditions

European settlers and enslaved Africans introduced Malaria and other tropical diseases to the Americas. These tropical diseases thrived in the swampy region of the Lowcountry. While many slaves were more resistant, the white planters were not. Therefore, whites moved their homes away from the rice fields and vacated the lowcountry at least during the humid season. For the Lowcountry Gullah, this isolation allowed for the creation and preservation of their distinct African culture.

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