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Feels - Win Picture | Webfail - Fail Pictures and Fail Videos.  Cute.  Old picture.

Feels - Win Picture

The Mad Hatter has a basis in real history. In the 18th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to treat felt used in the production of hats in England. Workers in hat factories were exposed to toxic levels of the heavy metal and often led to the onset of dementia.

The Mad Hatter has a basis in real history. In the 18th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to treat felt used in the production of hats in England. Workers in hat factories were exposed to toxic levels of the heavy metal and often led to the onset of dementia.

One of the most moving and thought provoking pictures I've ever seen. Blessing to those who are able to overlook blatant ignorance. I pray that one day we will be able to move past prejudice and learn to celebrate one another.  Life is too short to be ruled by hate.

One of the most moving and thought provoking pictures I've ever seen. Blessing to those who are able to overlook blatant ignorance. I pray that one day we will be able to move past prejudice and learn to celebrate one another. Life is too short to be ruled by hate.

io9 - Guild_Navigator - lady samurai

Amazing and Inspirational Women's Costumes to "Take Back Halloween"

Remembering History: Feodor Vassilyev (c. 1707[1]-1782) was a peasant from Shuya, Russia. His first wife, Mrs. Vassilyev sets the record for most children birthed by a single woman. She gave birth to a total of 69 children; however, few other details are known of her life, such as her date of birth or death. She gave birth to 16 pairs of twins, 7 sets of triplets and 4 sets of quadruplets between 1725 and 1765, in a total of 27 births. 67 of the 69 children born are said to have survived…

Remembering History: Feodor Vassilyev (c. 1707[1]-1782) was a peasant from Shuya, Russia. His first wife, Mrs. Vassilyev sets the record for most children birthed by a single woman. She gave birth to a total of 69 children; however, few other details are known of her life, such as her date of birth or death. She gave birth to 16 pairs of twins, 7 sets of triplets and 4 sets of quadruplets between 1725 and 1765, in a total of 27 births. 67 of the 69 children born are said to have survived…

A forgotten profession: In the days before alarm clocks were widely affordable, people like Mary Smith of Brenton Street were employed to rouse sleeping people in the early hours of the morning. They were commonly known as knocker-ups or knocker-uppers. Mrs. Smith was paid sixpence a week to shoot dried peas at market workers windows in Limehouse Fields, London. Photograph from Philip Davies Lost London: 1870-1945.

A forgotten profession: In the days before alarm clocks were widely affordable, people like Mary Smith of Brenton Street were employed to rouse sleeping people in the early hours of the morning. They were commonly known as knocker-ups or knocker-uppers. Mrs. Smith was paid sixpence a week to shoot dried peas at market workers windows in Limehouse Fields, London. Photograph from Philip Davies Lost London: 1870-1945.

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