The U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (NMMP) is a program administered by the U.S. Navy which studies the military use of marine mammals - principally Bottlenose Dolphins and California Sea Lions - and trains animals to perform tasks such as ship and harbor protection, mine detection and clearance, and equipment recovery. The program is based in San Diego, California, where animals are housed and trained on an ongoing basis. NMMP animal teams have been deployed for use in combat zones, such as…

The U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program (NMMP) is a program administered by the U.S. Navy which studies the military use of marine mammals - principally Bottlenose Dolphins and California Sea Lions - and trains animals to perform tasks such as ship and harbor protection, mine detection and clearance, and equipment recovery. The program is based in San Diego, California, where animals are housed and trained on an ongoing basis. NMMP animal teams have been deployed for use in combat zones, such as…

A marine mammal handler from the Navy Marine Mammal Program prepares to send Cody, a California sea lion, into the water during the International Mine Countermeasures Exercise (IMCMEX).

A marine mammal handler from the Navy Marine Mammal Program prepares to send Cody, a California sea lion, into the water during the International Mine Countermeasures Exercise (IMCMEX).

Navy Dolphins Scout for Mines in Croatia - Last week, six dolphins took off from their HQ at the U.S. Navy's Marine Mammal Program in San Diego on a flight to Zagreb, Croatia. Their mission (whether or not they chose to accept it): Find unexploded bombs and shells off the coast of Dubrovnik.

Navy Dolphins Scout for Mines in Croatia - Last week, six dolphins took off from their HQ at the U.S. Navy's Marine Mammal Program in San Diego on a flight to Zagreb, Croatia. Their mission (whether or not they chose to accept it): Find unexploded bombs and shells off the coast of Dubrovnik.

A trainer touches the nose of a U.S. Navy dolphin during a demonstration at the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program facility in San Diego.

A trainer touches the nose of a U.S. Navy dolphin during a demonstration at the U.S. Navy Marine Mammal Program facility in San Diego.

Dolphins have been serving in the U.S. Navy for more than 40 years as part of the Navy’s Marine Mammal Program, and they were used during the Vietnam War and Operation Iraqi Freedom. These highly intelligent animals are trained to detect, locate and mark mines — not to mention suspicious swimmers and divers.

Dolphins have been serving in the U.S. Navy for more than 40 years as part of the Navy’s Marine Mammal Program, and they were used during the Vietnam War and Operation Iraqi Freedom. These highly intelligent animals are trained to detect, locate and mark mines — not to mention suspicious swimmers and divers.

In 2003, Zak, a 375-pound California sea lion, was trained by the Navy to find swimmers near piers and ships or objects that were considered suspicious or a threat. Animals in Zak's program were all trained at the Navy's Marine Mammal Program in San Diego. Sea lions like Zak love action and having a purpose. They can even cuff a potential waterborne intruder!

In 2003, Zak, a 375-pound California sea lion, was trained by the Navy to find swimmers near piers and ships or objects that were considered suspicious or a threat. Animals in Zak's program were all trained at the Navy's Marine Mammal Program in San Diego. Sea lions like Zak love action and having a purpose. They can even cuff a potential waterborne intruder!

Sgt. James Jolly Plum "Duffy" - First Mascot of Marine Corps Base, San Diego.

Sgt. James Jolly Plum "Duffy" - First Mascot of Marine Corps Base, San Diego.

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