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Pasiune si visare... Copyright © David Postatny . All rights reserved. Note: "This photo is public" doesn't mean it is public domain or a free stock image. So, any use of this image without my written consent is illegal.

Cole Porter in his Beverly Hills home, 1954 • Photographed by Bob Willoughby

Cole Porter in his Beverly Hills home, 1954 • Photographed by Bob Willoughby

Clavicytheria, or upright harpsichords, were made as early as the 15th century, but tall examples such as this date from the late Baroque era. Having 2 sets of doors that conceal the strings, the case appears ungainly when open, but when closed it has a graceful outline embellished by gilded "wings" and stops control 2 sets of strings. The mechanism has been altered and the painted soundboard is a replacement; originally the instrument may have been an upright piano.

Clavicytheria, or upright harpsichords, were made as early as the 15th century, but tall examples such as this date from the late Baroque era. Having 2 sets of doors that conceal the strings, the case appears ungainly when open, but when closed it has a graceful outline embellished by gilded "wings" and stops control 2 sets of strings. The mechanism has been altered and the painted soundboard is a replacement; originally the instrument may have been an upright piano.

1848-1852 American(?) Apollo lyre at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - It's interesting to see, looking back over the years, just how much experimentation went on in creating the musical instruments we know today.  For instance, this is the only known "Apollo lyre" in existence - according to the curators, "The upward-pointing handles produce pressure and suction to sound a diatonic scale, as in an accordion or harmonica."

1848-1852 American(?) Apollo lyre at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York - It's interesting to see, looking back over the years, just how much experimentation went on in creating the musical instruments we know today. For instance, this is the only known "Apollo lyre" in existence - according to the curators, "The upward-pointing handles produce pressure and suction to sound a diatonic scale, as in an accordion or harmonica."

I started learning since I was 5 years old. When I was little, I really don't like to practice playing the piano. My mother used to push me to practice for test. But now, I am enjoying of playing the piano. I spent one hour to play the piano everyday.

♫

We're always talking about what it is we want our country to become, about how we can save ourselves as a people....But maybe the answer is not somewhere in the future distance; maybe the answer is one we already had, and somehow threw away.

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