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Celtic Stater, late 1st century BC Attributed to Dubnovellaunus, king of the Cantiaci, who ruled the Thanet area of Kent, south east England.

Celtic Stater, late 1st century BC Attributed to Dubnovellaunus, king of the Cantiaci, who ruled the Thanet area of Kent, south east England.

Byzantine Gold Solidus of Justinian I, c. 538 - 565. Minted in Constantinople

Byzantine Gold Solidus of Justinian I, c. 538 - 565. Minted in Constantinople

Quarter Noble of Edward III (r. 1327–77) Date: 1327–77 Culture: English Medium: Gold Dimensions: Overall: 1 1/16 x 1/16 in. (2.7 x 0.1 cm) Classification: Coins Accession Number: 99.35.7414

Quarter Noble of Edward III (r. 1327–77) Date: 1327–77 Culture: English Medium: Gold Dimensions: Overall: 1 1/16 x 1/16 in. (2.7 x 0.1 cm) Classification: Coins Accession Number: 99.35.7414

Gold Coin of the Parisii. 2nd century B.C. Made in Paris. Celtic

Gold Coin of the Parisii. 2nd century B.C. Made in Paris. Celtic

Coin of Vasudeva Date: 185–220 Culture: Pakistan (ancient region of Gandhara) Medium: Gold. The Great Kushan rulers minted these gold coins in the second and early third centuries. They follow a Roman weight standard, and the rulers present themselves in relation to a range of Near Eastern and South Asian deities, such as the Shiva on the reverse of Vasudeva's coin.

Coin of Vasudeva Date: 185–220 Culture: Pakistan (ancient region of Gandhara) Medium: Gold. The Great Kushan rulers minted these gold coins in the second and early third centuries. They follow a Roman weight standard, and the rulers present themselves in relation to a range of Near Eastern and South Asian deities, such as the Shiva on the reverse of Vasudeva's coin.

Date: 150–180 Culture: Pakistan (ancient region of Gandhara) Medium: Gold. The Great Kushan rulers minted these gold coins in the second and early third centuries. They follow a Roman weight standard, and the rulers present themselves in relation to a range of Near Eastern and South Asian deities, such as the Shiva on the reverse of Vasudeva's coin.

Date: 150–180 Culture: Pakistan (ancient region of Gandhara) Medium: Gold. The Great Kushan rulers minted these gold coins in the second and early third centuries. They follow a Roman weight standard, and the rulers present themselves in relation to a range of Near Eastern and South Asian deities, such as the Shiva on the reverse of Vasudeva's coin.

Coin of Kanishka, ca. 130 AD. Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara. Gold. The Great Kushan rulers minted these gold coins following a Roman weight standard. The rulers present themselves in relation to a range of Near Eastern and South Asian deities, such as Shiva as seen on the reverse of this coin.

Coin of Kanishka, ca. 130 AD. Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara. Gold. The Great Kushan rulers minted these gold coins following a Roman weight standard. The rulers present themselves in relation to a range of Near Eastern and South Asian deities, such as Shiva as seen on the reverse of this coin.

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