Explore these ideas and much more!

Memorials Kachkar

Memorials Kachkar

The Monastery of Harich or Harichavank,

The Monastery of Harich or Harichavank,

Chaczkary w Armenii (Noratus) | Fotografie i inne obrazy_(qp)_Barnaba.

Chaczkary w Armenii (Noratus) | Fotografie i inne obrazy_(qp)_Barnaba.

khachkars decorated with crosses, and in the form of small pyramids, Noraduz, Armenia

khachkars decorated with crosses, and in the form of small pyramids, Noraduz, Armenia

Sanahin ("Սանահին" in Armenian) is a village in the Northern Lori province of Armenia, now considered part of the city of Alaverdi and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with monasteries in Haghpat. The architectural complexes of Sanahin and Haghpat are among the outstanding works of medieval Armenian architecture. In their artistic merits they transcend the limits of national culture. The ensembles of Sanahin and Haghpat stand out not only for the original architecture of…

Sanahin ("Սանահին" in Armenian) is a village in the Northern Lori province of Armenia, now considered part of the city of Alaverdi and is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site along with monasteries in Haghpat. The architectural complexes of Sanahin and Haghpat are among the outstanding works of medieval Armenian architecture. In their artistic merits they transcend the limits of national culture. The ensembles of Sanahin and Haghpat stand out not only for the original architecture of…

A khachkar, also known as Armenian cross-stones is a carved, memorial stele bearing a cross, and often with additional motifs such as rosettes, interlaces, and botanical motifs. Khachkars are characteristic of Medieval Christian Armenian art

A khachkar, also known as Armenian cross-stones is a carved, memorial stele bearing a cross, and often with additional motifs such as rosettes, interlaces, and botanical motifs. Khachkars are characteristic of Medieval Christian Armenian art

Armenian khachkars, meaning "cross-stones," in Noratus Cemetery.  There are over 800 khachkars (stone crosses) in the territory of the cemetery, carved between the IX-XVII centuries.  This field with Khachkars’, in Noratus is the second largest after the historical cemetery at Jugha (Nakhichevan) with around 2,500 khachkars, which were systematically destroyed by Azerbaijan from 1998-2005.

Armenian khachkars, meaning "cross-stones," in Noratus Cemetery. There are over 800 khachkars (stone crosses) in the territory of the cemetery, carved between the IX-XVII centuries. This field with Khachkars’, in Noratus is the second largest after the historical cemetery at Jugha (Nakhichevan) with around 2,500 khachkars, which were systematically destroyed by Azerbaijan from 1998-2005.

medieval crosses | Medieval Armenian cross-stone (Khachkar)

Origins of Jerusalem cross

medieval crosses | Medieval Armenian cross-stone (Khachkar)

Old Jugha Cemetery 111-Armenian Old Jugha cemetery in Nakhichevan, currently included in Azerbaijan, was the largest Armenian cemetery ever known, included about 10,000 khachkars and several thousands tombstones of various shapes. Single khachkars were saved by moving to Armenia. The rest was completely bulldozed by Azerbaijani Turks in 2005. The photos here show what do not exist any longer. Photos are from 1903 up to 1987.

Old Jugha Cemetery 111-Armenian Old Jugha cemetery in Nakhichevan, currently included in Azerbaijan, was the largest Armenian cemetery ever known, included about 10,000 khachkars and several thousands tombstones of various shapes. Single khachkars were saved by moving to Armenia. The rest was completely bulldozed by Azerbaijani Turks in 2005. The photos here show what do not exist any longer. Photos are from 1903 up to 1987.

Pinterest
Search