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Board Ser Bis

Board Ser Bis

A great way to include science and literacy. Have students either draw out their own sea creature or pick on already up on the board. Then have students either sound out the name of their creature or look it up. Create an underwater display that allows the students to see the diversity that lives under the sea! This could be supplemented with an underwater unit or books.

A great way to include science and literacy. Have students either draw out their own sea creature or pick on already up on the board. Then have students either sound out the name of their creature or look it up. Create an underwater display that allows the students to see the diversity that lives under the sea! This could be supplemented with an underwater unit or books.

A baby octopus explores the seafloor in Veatch Canyon, offshore of Nantucket, Mass. The deep sea species, Graneledone verrucosa, lives throughout the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

A baby octopus explores the seafloor in Veatch Canyon, offshore of Nantucket, Mass. The deep sea species, Graneledone verrucosa, lives throughout the Northwest Atlantic Ocean.

When threatened the Atolla Jellyfish respond by creating a moving  circular wave of light around their outer edge which is referred to as a  “burglar alarm” response. Scientists theorise that jellyfish use this  response to attract large animals in to eat jellyfish predators. So basically, when the jellyfish is under attack, it starts lighting up so that other, bigger, scarier animals will be attracted to the scene and (hopefully) eat the thing attacking the Atolla Jelly.

When threatened the Atolla Jellyfish respond by creating a moving circular wave of light around their outer edge which is referred to as a “burglar alarm” response. Scientists theorise that jellyfish use this response to attract large animals in to eat jellyfish predators. So basically, when the jellyfish is under attack, it starts lighting up so that other, bigger, scarier animals will be attracted to the scene and (hopefully) eat the thing attacking the Atolla Jelly.

Banded Sea Krait - "The banded sea krait’s lethal venom packs a punch ten times more toxic than a rattlesnake’s, but fortunately these serpents are so meek that human bites are rare. Kraits cruise the shallow, tropical waters of coral reefs and mangrove swamps. But, alone among the sea snakes, they are amphibious and able to spend up to ten days at a time on land. Sea kraits hit the beach to digest their food (mostly eels and fish), mate, and lay eggs."

Banded Sea Krait - "The banded sea krait’s lethal venom packs a punch ten times more toxic than a rattlesnake’s, but fortunately these serpents are so meek that human bites are rare. Kraits cruise the shallow, tropical waters of coral reefs and mangrove swamps. But, alone among the sea snakes, they are amphibious and able to spend up to ten days at a time on land. Sea kraits hit the beach to digest their food (mostly eels and fish), mate, and lay eggs."

Underwater photographer Mauricio Handler was scuba diving near the reefs of Curacao, in the Caribbean Sea, a while back and made an amusing discovery. Handler's wife, Julia, spotted this Cookie Monster look-alike hanging out under the sea, presumably trying to hide out among less-notable creatures. It wasn't actually the beloved dessert fiend from "Sesame Street". It's actually a stove-pipe sponge, which eats plankton, not cookies or anything even close.

Underwater photographer Mauricio Handler was scuba diving near the reefs of Curacao, in the Caribbean Sea, a while back and made an amusing discovery. Handler's wife, Julia, spotted this Cookie Monster look-alike hanging out under the sea, presumably trying to hide out among less-notable creatures. It wasn't actually the beloved dessert fiend from "Sesame Street". It's actually a stove-pipe sponge, which eats plankton, not cookies or anything even close.

Plankton is not the name of a plant or animal but more of a category for any drifting organism that inhabits the middle to upper levels of the ocean, namely the pelagic zone. Interestingly, the word plankton is Greek for “wanderer” or “drifter”. While some forms of plankton can move several hundreds of meters vertically in a single day …

Plankton is not the name of a plant or animal but more of a category for any drifting organism that inhabits the middle to upper levels of the ocean, namely the pelagic zone. Interestingly, the word plankton is Greek for “wanderer” or “drifter”. While some forms of plankton can move several hundreds of meters vertically in a single day …

Orca Mother and Calf - beautiful sea creatures belong in the sea not aquariums

Orca Mother and Calf - beautiful sea creatures belong in the sea not aquariums

Commonly known as sea swallow, blue dragon, blue sea slug and blue ocean slug etc. Actually they are a species of small-sized blue sea slugs.  A marine gastropod mollusk in the family Glaucidae.  The normal size of this species is up to 3 cm.  It has a tapering body which is flattened and has six appendages which branch out into rayed cerata. Its radular teeth bear serrated teeth on their blades. Glaucus is a hermaphrodite, containing both male and female reproductive organs.

Commonly known as sea swallow, blue dragon, blue sea slug and blue ocean slug etc. Actually they are a species of small-sized blue sea slugs. A marine gastropod mollusk in the family Glaucidae. The normal size of this species is up to 3 cm. It has a tapering body which is flattened and has six appendages which branch out into rayed cerata. Its radular teeth bear serrated teeth on their blades. Glaucus is a hermaphrodite, containing both male and female reproductive organs.

The Colossal Squid is believed to be the largest squid species. Though it is known from only a few specimens, current estimates put its maximum size at 12 - 14 metres (39 - 46 feet) long, based on analysis of smaller and immature specimens, making it the largest known invertebrate.

The Colossal Squid is believed to be the largest squid species. Though it is known from only a few specimens, current estimates put its maximum size at 12 - 14 metres (39 - 46 feet) long, based on analysis of smaller and immature specimens, making it the largest known invertebrate.

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