Explore Male Angels, Angels And Demons and more!

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Little Petherick, St. male angel statue Padstow, Little Petherick, St Petroc Minor angel with lot’s of feathers , Seraphim

Illustration of a scene from John Milton's Paradise Lost, wherein Satan falls into the river Styx (Hate)by Darodes, c. 1868.

Illustration of a scene from John Milton's Paradise Lost, wherein Satan falls into the river Styx (Hate)by Darodes, c. 1868.

The demon of Eriis according to humans who have never seen one. The Devil…

The demon of Eriis according to humans who have never seen one. The Devil…

Portrait of an Italian - Artista: Edgar Degas Data da Conclusão: 1856 Estilo: Impressionism Género: portrait Técnica: charcoal Dimensões: 38 x 26 cm Galeria: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Portrait of an Italian - Artista: Edgar Degas Data da Conclusão: 1856 Estilo: Impressionism Género: portrait Técnica: charcoal Dimensões: 38 x 26 cm Galeria: Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Pandemonium - Satan's royal palace he has constructed for himself in Hell, where he summons all his demons together for council on how to get revenge on God. "Pandemonium" literally means "all demons".

Pandemonium - Satan's royal palace he has constructed for himself in Hell, where he summons all his demons together for council on how to get revenge on God. "Pandemonium" literally means "all demons".

In Greek mythology, Charon or Kharon is the ferryman of Hades who carries souls of the newly deceased across the rivers Styx and Acheron that divided the world of the living from the world of the dead. A coin to pay Charon for passage, usually an obolus or danake, was sometimes placed in or on the mouth of a dead person. Some authors say that those who could not pay the fee, or those whose bodies were left unburied, had to wander the shores for one hundred years.

In Greek mythology, Charon or Kharon is the ferryman of Hades who carries souls of the newly deceased across the rivers Styx and Acheron that divided the world of the living from the world of the dead. A coin to pay Charon for passage, usually an obolus or danake, was sometimes placed in or on the mouth of a dead person. Some authors say that those who could not pay the fee, or those whose bodies were left unburied, had to wander the shores for one hundred years.

"Paradise Lost. The Creation of Light" by John Martin (1789-1854, United Kingdom)

"Paradise Lost. The Creation of Light" by John Martin (1789-1854, United Kingdom)

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