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Community: Our humble role in saving a dying species

Community: Our humble role in saving a dying species

Two newborn and extremely endangered spoon-billed sandpiper chicks feed on insects after hatching from 20 eggs imported from Russia

Two newborn and extremely endangered spoon-billed sandpiper chicks feed on insects after hatching from 20 eggs imported from Russia

Thousands came together for the world's Largest camel race. The people of Mongolia participated in the annual festival in order to encourage re-population of the dying species! Such wonderful efforts for a title. #animals #camel #desert #cool #facts #DYK #kids #animal #Mongolia #funfacts

Thousands came together for the world's Largest camel race. The people of Mongolia participated in the annual festival in order to encourage re-population of the dying species! Such wonderful efforts for a title. #animals #camel #desert #cool #facts #DYK #kids #animal #Mongolia #funfacts

Scientists now estimate that at least 211,000 of the antelopes — more than half of the species — died in May and suspect that rough weather was a trigger.

Scientists now estimate that at least 211,000 of the antelopes — more than half of the species — died in May and suspect that rough weather was a trigger.

The spoon-billed sandpiper is one of the world's rarest birds; there are thought to be less than 100 breeding pairs left in the wild

The spoon-billed sandpiper is one of the world's rarest birds; there are thought to be less than 100 breeding pairs left in the wild

A quarter of a billion years ago, long before dinosaurs or mammals evolved, the 10-foot (0.3-meter) predator Dinogorgon, whose skull is shown here, hunted floodplains in the heart of today's South Africa. In less than a million years Dinogorgon vanished in the greatest mass extinction ever (the End-Permian Extinction, a/k/a "The Great Dying"), along with about nine of every ten plant and animal species on the planet.

A quarter of a billion years ago, long before dinosaurs or mammals evolved, the 10-foot (0.3-meter) predator Dinogorgon, whose skull is shown here, hunted floodplains in the heart of today's South Africa. In less than a million years Dinogorgon vanished in the greatest mass extinction ever (the End-Permian Extinction, a/k/a "The Great Dying"), along with about nine of every ten plant and animal species on the planet.

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