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Bernard, J. (French artist, active late 19th century), A Trompe l

Bernard, J. (French artist, active late 19th century), A Trompe l

c.1790-1820: Georgian Eye Jewellery “Eye miniatures came into fashion at the end of the 18th century. In France, where eye miniature seems to have originated, the eye as symbol of watchfulness was adopted by the state police for buckles and belts. In Britain it had a role as a love token, with some eye miniatures glistening with a trompe-l’oeil tear, or a diamond set to imitate a tear.  V and A M

c.1790-1820: Georgian Eye Jewellery “Eye miniatures came into fashion at the end of the 18th century. In France, where eye miniature seems to have originated, the eye as symbol of watchfulness was adopted by the state police for buckles and belts. In Britain it had a role as a love token, with some eye miniatures glistening with a trompe-l’oeil tear, or a diamond set to imitate a tear. V and A M

Antique Print Decoration Door Panel Ornament Louis XV Style Plate 32 Gruz 1860 | eBay

Antique Print-DECORATION-DOOR PANEL-ORNAMENT-LOUIS XV STYLE-PLATE 32-Gruz-1860

Antique Print Decoration Door Panel Ornament Louis XV Style Plate 32 Gruz 1860 | eBay

Evening Dress: ca. 1923-1928, French, beaded silk. If I was having dinner with the Crawley's at Downton Abbey

Evening Dress: ca. 1923-1928, French, beaded silk. If I was having dinner with the Crawley's at Downton Abbey

This might just be the coolest ceiling paint I've ever seen.  I love Asian inspired decor.

This might just be the coolest ceiling paint I've ever seen. I love Asian inspired decor.

FAUX BRICK WALL (joint compound and paint) Click the link below to get the "how to"

DIY Faux Bricks- Paint

FAUX BRICK WALL (joint compound and paint) Click the link below to get the "how to"

Vittorio Carpaccio (1460–1525) and Jacopo de' Barbari (c.1440–before 1516) added small trompe-l'œil features to their paintings, playfully exploring the boundary between image and reality.

Vittorio Carpaccio (1460–1525) and Jacopo de' Barbari (c.1440–before 1516) added small trompe-l'œil features to their paintings, playfully exploring the boundary between image and reality.

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