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Writing board, ca. 1981–1802 B.C. Egypt. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Edward S. Harkness, 1928 (28.9.4) | Gessoed boards were used for writing notes or school exercises. Like the slate writing tablets of yesteryear, they could be used repeatedly, with old texts being whitewashed to provide a “clean slate” for another.

Writing board, ca. 1981–1802 B.C. Egypt. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Edward S. Harkness, 1928 (28.9.4) | Gessoed boards were used for writing notes or school exercises. Like the slate writing tablets of yesteryear, they could be used repeatedly, with old texts being whitewashed to provide a “clean slate” for another.

Sweden's most splendid proto-prehistoric object is a 1500 year-old gold collar from Ålleberg which was made so skillfully that today’s goldsmiths do not know how it was made. Made of seven tubular rings, each divided into halves and joined together by a hinge. The spaces between the rings are filled with small miniature figures, humans and animals, almost invisible to the eye. Some have suggested that together they tell a story. Only 9 inches in diameter, some question how it was worn.

Sweden's most splendid proto-prehistoric object is a 1500 year-old gold collar from Ålleberg which was made so skillfully that today’s goldsmiths do not know how it was made. Made of seven tubular rings, each divided into halves and joined together by a hinge. The spaces between the rings are filled with small miniature figures, humans and animals, almost invisible to the eye. Some have suggested that together they tell a story. Only 9 inches in diameter, some question how it was worn.

Matthew Brady - Ford's Theatre ~Chair in which President Lincoln was sitting when shot, c. 1865

Matthew Brady - Ford's Theatre ~Chair in which President Lincoln was sitting when shot, c. 1865

Bronze furniture attachment. Period: Early Imperial, Augustan. Date: late 1st century B.C.–early 1st century A.D. Culture: Roman.

Bronze furniture attachment. Period: Early Imperial, Augustan. Date: late 1st century B.C.–early 1st century A.D. Culture: Roman.

Graffiti in a cell in the Tower of London.  This takes dedication and also looks eerily similar to cave carvings with a more sophisticated language.

Graffiti in a cell in the Tower of London. This takes dedication and also looks eerily similar to cave carvings with a more sophisticated language.

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