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Silver crescent from the Aberdeenshire hoard. Image credit: © National Museum Scotland.

Silver crescent from the Aberdeenshire hoard. Image credit: © National Museum Scotland.

A Roman coin from the Aberdeenshire hoard. Image credit: © Phil Wilkinson / University of Aberdeen.

A Roman coin from the Aberdeenshire hoard. Image credit: © Phil Wilkinson / University of Aberdeen.

Silver objects from the Aberdeenshire hoard, from left to right, top to bottom: fragment of a zoomorphic silver brooch, an undecorated brooch, silver ingot, and a folded bracelet. Image credit: © National Museum Scotland.

Silver objects from the Aberdeenshire hoard, from left to right, top to bottom: fragment of a zoomorphic silver brooch, an undecorated brooch, silver ingot, and a folded bracelet. Image credit: © National Museum Scotland.

Archaeologist examines a crescent shaped brooch fragment from the Aberdeenshire hoard. Image credit: © Phil Wilkinson / University of Aberdeen.

Archaeologist examines a crescent shaped brooch fragment from the Aberdeenshire hoard. Image credit: © Phil Wilkinson / University of Aberdeen.

Artifacts from the Viking hoards on display at Denmark’s National Museum (Nationalmuseet) in Copenhagen during the summer 2013.

Artifacts from the Viking hoards on display at Denmark’s National Museum (Nationalmuseet) in Copenhagen during the summer 2013.

The Cuerdale Hoard is a hoard of more than 8,600 items, including silver coins, English and Carolingian jewellery, hacksilver and ingots. It was discovered on 15 May 1840. The Cuerdale Hoard is the largest Viking silver hoard ever found outside Russia, and exceeds in number of pieces and weight any hoard found in Scandinavia or any other western areas settled by the Vikings.

The Cuerdale Hoard is a hoard of more than 8,600 items, including silver coins, English and Carolingian jewellery, hacksilver and ingots. It was discovered on 15 May 1840. The Cuerdale Hoard is the largest Viking silver hoard ever found outside Russia, and exceeds in number of pieces and weight any hoard found in Scandinavia or any other western areas settled by the Vikings.

Brooch in the Form of a Bird of Prey, 500–600 Vendel; made in Scandinavia Copper alloy with silver This crouching bird of prey, usually identified as an eagle, is thought to represent Odin, the supreme god of war and battle in Nordic mythology. The design is an early example of the sort of animal motifs that become so important in Viking art.

Brooch in the Form of a Bird of Prey, 500–600 Vendel; made in Scandinavia Copper alloy with silver This crouching bird of prey, usually identified as an eagle, is thought to represent Odin, the supreme god of war and battle in Nordic mythology. The design is an early example of the sort of animal motifs that become so important in Viking art.

Anglo-Saxon shield ornament from Sturry, Kent, England.    Sixth Century AD, the design shows an eagle or raven.    From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

Anglo-Saxon shield ornament from Sturry, Kent, England. Sixth Century AD, the design shows an eagle or raven. From the collection of the British Museum, London, England.

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