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The remains of King Richard III. The lower jaw shows a cut mark caused by a knife or dagger. The archaeologists say the wounds to Richard's head could have been what killed him.

The remains of King Richard III. The lower jaw shows a cut mark caused by a knife or dagger. The archaeologists say the wounds to Richard's head could have been what killed him.

Richard III Society.  Here you can find info about the "Looking for Richard" project.  Fascinating stuff.  And he didn't murder those princes.

Richard III Society. Here you can find info about the "Looking for Richard" project. Fascinating stuff. And he didn't murder those princes.

The left is the skull of someone who had tuberculosis, and the right is syphilis. Nasty!

The left is the skull of someone who had tuberculosis, and the right is syphilis. Nasty!

This particular link holds only a handful of medical procedures and tools from the past dating all the way back to the 1700's. Check it out! :D

Creepy Medical Images From The Past

This particular link holds only a handful of medical procedures and tools from the past dating all the way back to the 1700's. Check it out! :D

The Officially Commissioned Tomb Design for King Richard III - Tomb Gallery - Lost in Castles

The Officially Commissioned Tomb Design for King Richard III - Tomb Gallery - Lost in Castles

19th century cranium with caries sicca caused by the gummatous lesions of syphilis. This is an extreme example of tertiary syphilis (neurosyphilis). Pitted lesions erode, heal and scar over many years and infection of the brain and other parts of the body along with advanced dementia would have also occurred.

19th century cranium with caries sicca caused by the gummatous lesions of syphilis. This is an extreme example of tertiary syphilis (neurosyphilis). Pitted lesions erode, heal and scar over many years and infection of the brain and other parts of the body along with advanced dementia would have also occurred.

On August 24, 79 AD, Mount Vesuvius erupted and destroyed the ancient cities of Pompeii, Stabiae and Herculaneum—one of Europe's most catastrophic volcanic eruptions to date. Today, two million people live in the vicinity of Mount Vesuvius, and the volcano is still active.  Watch this clip of workers in the 1930s excavating Herculaneum, Pompeii's sister city: https://curiosity.com/video/the-city-that-vanished-1932-british-pathe/?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=082414pin

On August 24, 79 AD, Mount Vesuvius erupted and destroyed the ancient cities of Pompeii, Stabiae and Herculaneum—one of Europe's most catastrophic volcanic eruptions to date. Today, two million people live in the vicinity of Mount Vesuvius, and the volcano is still active. Watch this clip of workers in the 1930s excavating Herculaneum, Pompeii's sister city: https://curiosity.com/video/the-city-that-vanished-1932-british-pathe/?utm_source=pinterest&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=082414pin

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