This is a yellow-headed jawfish male that incubates its eggs (or its brood) in its mouth. That’s right–the male carries the babies. In the beginning, the jawfish is able to swallow the eggs, keeping them hidden, and occasionally spits them out to grab a bite, then sucks them back in, all in one gulp. It is fascinating to watch, and quite a challenge. The challenge gets tougher as the brood develops and gets larger. What was so sweet though was that after about an hour of observation with…

This is a yellow-headed jawfish male that incubates its eggs (or its brood) in its mouth. That’s right–the male carries the babies. In the beginning, the jawfish is able to swallow the eggs, keeping them hidden, and occasionally spits them out to grab a bite, then sucks them back in, all in one gulp. It is fascinating to watch, and quite a challenge. The challenge gets tougher as the brood develops and gets larger. What was so sweet though was that after about an hour of observation with…

O fotógrafo ucraniano Vyacheslav Mishchenko têm documentado nos últimos anos a vida cotidiana dos caracóis em seus “mundos delicados” utilizando a fotografia macro.

As delicadas fotografias do mundo dos caracóis de Vyacheslav Mishchenko

O fotógrafo ucraniano Vyacheslav Mishchenko têm documentado nos últimos anos a vida cotidiana dos caracóis em seus “mundos delicados” utilizando a fotografia macro.

Beautiful nope is beautiful

Beautiful nope is beautiful

libutron: “Painted Tiger Moth - Arachnis picta The Painted Tiger Moth, Arachnis picta (Arctiidae), is a North American moth which can be found in the United States (Central and southern California to...

the stripes on the octopus Wunderpus photogenicus are unique to each animal and could be used to track these animals in the wild in much the same way that whales are tracked.    Read more: http://reefbuilders.com/2009/02/09/wunderpus-unique-markings-photoidentification/#ixzz2HQ6a9tLB

the stripes on the octopus Wunderpus photogenicus are unique to each animal and could be used to track these animals in the wild in much the same way that whales are tracked. Read more: http://reefbuilders.com/2009/02/09/wunderpus-unique-markings-photoidentification/#ixzz2HQ6a9tLB

Pinterest
Search