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Armenian national dances

Armenian national dances

Ruins of a village at Harran. Harran: receiving its first mention in recorded history around 1850 BCE, adding geometric shapes subconsciously to the chaos theory.

Ruins of a village at Harran. Harran: receiving its first mention in recorded history around 1850 BCE, adding geometric shapes subconsciously to the chaos theory.

Armenian Women from Kars, Turkey. For a brief period of time, Kars served as the capital of the medieval Bagratid Kingdom of Armenia. During World War I, the Ottomans took control of the city in 1918, but were forced to relinquish it to the First Republic of Armenia following the Armistice of Mudros. During the Turkish–Armenian War in late 1920, Turkish revolutionaries captured Kars for the last time.

Armenian Women from Kars, Turkey. For a brief period of time, Kars served as the capital of the medieval Bagratid Kingdom of Armenia. During World War I, the Ottomans took control of the city in 1918, but were forced to relinquish it to the First Republic of Armenia following the Armistice of Mudros. During the Turkish–Armenian War in late 1920, Turkish revolutionaries captured Kars for the last time.

Faravahar. One of the best-known symbols of Zoroastrianism, the state religion of ancient Iran

Faravahar. One of the best-known symbols of Zoroastrianism, the state religion of ancient Iran

The Four Gospels in Armenian  British Library Add. MS 19727, f.240  Copyright © The British Library Board

The Four Gospels in Armenian British Library Add. MS 19727, f.240 Copyright © The British Library Board

Cross-stones at The monastery of Geghard, Armenia, by Suren Manvelyan.  The rock-faces over the whole area bear elaborate crosses (khatchkar) carved in relief.  There are many often richly ornamented khachkars cut on rock surfaces and on the walls of the structures or put up on the grounds of Geghard in memory of a deceased or in commemoration of someone’s donation to the monastery.

Cross-stones at The monastery of Geghard, Armenia, by Suren Manvelyan. The rock-faces over the whole area bear elaborate crosses (khatchkar) carved in relief. There are many often richly ornamented khachkars cut on rock surfaces and on the walls of the structures or put up on the grounds of Geghard in memory of a deceased or in commemoration of someone’s donation to the monastery.

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