Explore Vintage Geisha, Vintage Japan and more!

Image issue du site Web https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2487/3924549756_42c63994c6.jpg

Image issue du site Web https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2487/3924549756_42c63994c6.jpg

A Hangyoku (Young Geisha) holding a Kumade or "Lucky Charm Rake", which are sometimes styled to resemble cypress-slat fans, as here. The Otafuku mask or “Goddess of Mirth” is generally attached to help rake in happiness and prosperity. Kumade are sold at Tori-no-Ichi Festivals that are held in November, throughout Japan. The largest of the Tori-no-Ichi Festivals are in Tokyo.

A Hangyoku (Young Geisha) holding a Kumade or "Lucky Charm Rake", which are sometimes styled to resemble cypress-slat fans, as here. The Otafuku mask or “Goddess of Mirth” is generally attached to help rake in happiness and prosperity. Kumade are sold at Tori-no-Ichi Festivals that are held in November, throughout Japan. The largest of the Tori-no-Ichi Festivals are in Tokyo.

Japanese five yen coin (go-en: go-en also means fate / bond in Japanese) at Mt. Takao, Japan

Japanese five yen coin (go-en: go-en also means fate / bond in Japanese) at Mt. Takao, Japan

View from the top of the tower of Akashi-Kaikyō Bridge, Japan (by tioguerra)

View from the top of the tower of Akashi-Kaikyō Bridge, Japan (by tioguerra)

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