The bronze head of King Seuthes III, ruler of the Ancient Thracian Odrysian Kingdom in 331-300 BC, (left) will be shown in the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of the "Power and Pathos" exhibition of ancient bronze sculptures. Photo: Bulgaria's Ministry of Culture

The bronze head of King Seuthes III, ruler of the Ancient Thracian Odrysian Kingdom in 331-300 BC, (left) will be shown in the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of the "Power and Pathos" exhibition of ancient bronze sculptures. Photo: Bulgaria's Ministry of Culture

The bronze head of King Seuthes III, ruler of the Ancient Thracian Odrysian Kingdom ca.331-ca 300, and a mural from the Kazanlak Tomb, as exhibited in Bulgaria’s Ancient Thracian exhibit in the Louvre Museum, Paris, France. Photo: Musée du Louvre / Antoine Mongodin / Louvre Museum Facebook Page

The bronze head of King Seuthes III, ruler of the Ancient Thracian Odrysian Kingdom ca.331-ca 300, and a mural from the Kazanlak Tomb, as exhibited in Bulgaria’s Ancient Thracian exhibit in the Louvre Museum, Paris, France. Photo: Musée du Louvre / Antoine Mongodin / Louvre Museum Facebook Page

In the 1940s, archaeologists discovered the ancient city of Seuthopolis, the capital seat of the Odrysian Kingdom beginning in the 4th century BCE. Unfortunately, the discovery came too late, because under construction nearby was a reservoir dam, which would soon flood the valley and drown “the best preserved Thracian city in modern Bulgaria.” Now they are trying to uncover it permanently.

In the 1940s, archaeologists discovered the ancient city of Seuthopolis, the capital seat of the Odrysian Kingdom beginning in the 4th century BCE. Unfortunately, the discovery came too late, because under construction nearby was a reservoir dam, which would soon flood the valley and drown “the best preserved Thracian city in modern Bulgaria.” Now they are trying to uncover it permanently.

The Thracian civilization which inhabited the land south of the Balkan mountains had formed the Odrysian kingdom in the 5th century BC along the banks of the Maritza. King Seuthes III moved its capital to Seutopolis (present-day Kazanluk in Southern Bulgaria) and was buried there, in the Valley of the Thracian Kings, around 300 BC. It is thought that the Panagyurishte treasure was used to serve ceremonial wine in his palace.

The Golden Treasure of Panagyurishte

The Thracian civilization which inhabited the land south of the Balkan mountains had formed the Odrysian kingdom in the 5th century BC along the banks of the Maritza. King Seuthes III moved its capital to Seutopolis (present-day Kazanluk in Southern Bulgaria) and was buried there, in the Valley of the Thracian Kings, around 300 BC. It is thought that the Panagyurishte treasure was used to serve ceremonial wine in his palace.

Odrysian kingdom under Sitalces - The Odrysian Kingdom was a state union of Thracian tribes that existed between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC. It consisted mainly of present-day Bulgaria, spreading to parts of Northern Dobruja, parts of Northern Greece and parts of modern-day European Turkey. King Seuthes III later moved the capital to Seuthopolis.

Odrysian kingdom under Sitalces - The Odrysian Kingdom was a state union of Thracian tribes that existed between the 5th and 3rd centuries BC. It consisted mainly of present-day Bulgaria, spreading to parts of Northern Dobruja, parts of Northern Greece and parts of modern-day European Turkey. King Seuthes III later moved the capital to Seuthopolis.

BURGAS, BULGARIA—A marble slab bearing a first-century A.D. Greek inscription from the Odrysian Kingdom, the most powerful of the ancient Thracian states, has been unearthed at the site of Aquae Calidae, an ancient spa resort. “This is a historical monument of international importance,” archaeologist Miroslave Klasnakov told Archaeology in Bulgaria. The inscription, which belonged to Apollonius, son of Eptaikentus, a military governor, had been built into an altar and mentions the names of…

BURGAS, BULGARIA—A marble slab bearing a first-century A.D. Greek inscription from the Odrysian Kingdom, the most powerful of the ancient Thracian states, has been unearthed at the site of Aquae Calidae, an ancient spa resort. “This is a historical monument of international importance,” archaeologist Miroslave Klasnakov told Archaeology in Bulgaria. The inscription, which belonged to Apollonius, son of Eptaikentus, a military governor, had been built into an altar and mentions the names of…

Thracian Bronze Head of Seuthes III, Late 4th-Early 3rd Century BC Found in the Golyamata Kosmatka mound, a little over a half a mile south of the town of Shipka, Bulgaria.

Thracian Bronze Head of Seuthes III, Late 4th-Early 3rd Century BC Found in the Golyamata Kosmatka mound, a little over a half a mile south of the town of Shipka, Bulgaria.

The newly discovered Ancient Thracian inscription from Aquae Calidae is dated to 26-37 AD, about a decade before the Odrysian Kingdom, and respectively Ancient Thrace, was fully conquered by the Roman Empire. Photo: Burgas Municipality

The newly discovered Ancient Thracian inscription from Aquae Calidae is dated to 26-37 AD, about a decade before the Odrysian Kingdom, and respectively Ancient Thrace, was fully conquered by the Roman Empire. Photo: Burgas Municipality

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