Brooch, ca. 1850 [Top] Gold, jet, pearls, crystal, hair The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Susan and Jon Rotenstreich Gift, 2000

Brooch, ca. 1850 [Top] Gold, jet, pearls, crystal, hair The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Susan and Jon Rotenstreich Gift, 2000

Sold lot of 3 Mourning Jewelry Pieces : Lot 142 from live auctioneers at http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/29065674_lot-of-3-mourning-jewelry-pieces

Sold lot of 3 Mourning Jewelry Pieces : Lot 142 from live auctioneers at http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/29065674_lot-of-3-mourning-jewelry-pieces

Victorian mourning pendant is made with 18k yellow gold, seed pearls, and a coiled lock of hair behind a glass panel.

Antique Victorian 18k Yellow Gold Hair Pendant

Victorian mourning pendant is made with 18k yellow gold, seed pearls, and a coiled lock of hair behind a glass panel.

Art of Mourning | A resource for mourning, memorial, sentimental jewellery and art

Art of Mourning | A resource for mourning, memorial, sentimental jewellery and art

memento mori ring, c.1550-1600. The bezel (head) of this ring has a death's head surrounded by the inscription 'BE HOLD THE ENDE'. A second inscription, 'RATHER DEATH THAN FALS FAITH' runs around the edge. On the reverse of the bezel are the initials 'ML' connected by a true lover's knot. This suggests it was used as a betrothal or marriage ring.

Ring

memento mori ring, c.1550-1600. The bezel (head) of this ring has a death's head surrounded by the inscription 'BE HOLD THE ENDE'. A second inscription, 'RATHER DEATH THAN FALS FAITH' runs around the edge. On the reverse of the bezel are the initials 'ML' connected by a true lover's knot. This suggests it was used as a betrothal or marriage ring.

“lover’s eyes,” hand-painted miniatures of single human eyes set in jewelry and given as tokens of affection or remembrance. In 1785, when the Prince of Wales secretly proposed to Mrs. Maria Fitzherbert with a miniature of his own eye, he inspired an aristocratic fad for exchanging eye portraits mounted in a wide variety of settings including brooches, rings, lockets, and toothpick cases.

“lover’s eyes,” hand-painted miniatures of single human eyes set in jewelry and given as tokens of affection or remembrance. In 1785, when the Prince of Wales secretly proposed to Mrs. Maria Fitzherbert with a miniature of his own eye, he inspired an aristocratic fad for exchanging eye portraits mounted in a wide variety of settings including brooches, rings, lockets, and toothpick cases.

Portraits Before & After Death | The Order of The Good Death   "I’ve shared these photos before. Not once.  But five or six times (on facebook, the old tumblr, twitter, etc).  I think they’re near perfect and the reason photography was invented– not to instagram your food, people.  They present a portrait of a dying person before and then directly after they die.  There is a beauty to it, dead people looking dead, as they should (not made up in wigs and makeup)."

Portraits Before & After Death | The Order of The Good Death "I’ve shared these photos before. Not once. But five or six times (on facebook, the old tumblr, twitter, etc). I think they’re near perfect and the reason photography was invented– not to instagram your food, people. They present a portrait of a dying person before and then directly after they die. There is a beauty to it, dead people looking dead, as they should (not made up in wigs and makeup)."

Star-Shaped Brooch with Intaglio, setting 960–1000, intaglio 337–361  Ottonian (setting), Byzantine (intaglio)  Gold with pearls and star sapphire

Star-Shaped Brooch with Intaglio, setting 960–1000, intaglio 337–361 Ottonian (setting), Byzantine (intaglio) Gold with pearls and star sapphire

Mourning jewelry included miniature portraits or photographs of the dead often accompanied by motifs of tombstones or clouds, depicting the departed soul’s ascension to heaven. The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire. New York. New York, USA.

Death becomes her: a century of mourning attire at the Met

Mourning jewelry included miniature portraits or photographs of the dead often accompanied by motifs of tombstones or clouds, depicting the departed soul’s ascension to heaven. The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire. New York. New York, USA.

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