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Pharaoh Senwosret II "Khaképer Rê" (Sésostris II) of the 12th Dynasty pectoral #OromoEgypt

Pharaoh Senwosret II "Khaképer Rê" (Sésostris II) of the 12th Dynasty pectoral #OromoEgypt

"In a place where there are no men, strive to be a man." (Pirkei Avot 2:6)

"In a place where there are no men, strive to be a man." (Pirkei Avot 2:6)

Egyptian ornaments and symbols/good for color choices for embroidery

Egyptian ornaments and symbols/good for color choices for embroidery

Blue-laced Okegawa Do Gusoko. Edo period (18th century) Sixty-two-plate russet iron hoshi-bachi Kabuto, mounted with a long, gilt-wood kuwagata-style maedate, the wide mabisashi (brim) lacquered in black and gold with a dragon and clouds, the Okegawa do (cuirass formed of joined horizontal bands) of eight plates decorated in black, red and gold lacquer with a snarling dragon eyeing three butterflies on the munaita (upper breast plate), Japan. S)

Blue-laced Okegawa Do Gusoko. Edo period (18th century) Sixty-two-plate russet iron hoshi-bachi Kabuto, mounted with a long, gilt-wood kuwagata-style maedate, the wide mabisashi (brim) lacquered in black and gold with a dragon and clouds, the Okegawa do (cuirass formed of joined horizontal bands) of eight plates decorated in black, red and gold lacquer with a snarling dragon eyeing three butterflies on the munaita (upper breast plate), Japan. S)

The Dancing Plague of 1518 was a case of dancing mania that occurred in Strasbourg, Alsace (then part of the Holy Roman Empire) in July 1518. Numerous people took to dancing for days without rest, and, over the period of about one month, some of those affected died of heart attack, stroke, or exhaustion. “The Pilgrimage of epileptics to Meulebeeck”, Hendrick Hondrius, after a drawing by Pieter Bruegel the Elder from 1564; It is believed that Bruegel was an eyewitness to these events.

The Dancing Plague of 1518 was a case of dancing mania that occurred in Strasbourg, Alsace (then part of the Holy Roman Empire) in July 1518. Numerous people took to dancing for days without rest, and, over the period of about one month, some of those affected died of heart attack, stroke, or exhaustion. “The Pilgrimage of epileptics to Meulebeeck”, Hendrick Hondrius, after a drawing by Pieter Bruegel the Elder from 1564; It is believed that Bruegel was an eyewitness to these events.

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