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In situ tile floor possibly joining on to the rear wall of the choir near Richard III's grave.  Photo credit: University of Leicester

In situ tile floor possibly joining on to the rear wall of the choir near Richard III's grave. Photo credit: University of Leicester

These fragments of a tile were once part of a highly decorated floor at Chertsey Abbey, Surrey. Pavements of decorated ceramic tiles were a medieval innovation. They were used to add richness and splendour to great churches initially but they were subsequently used in secular contexts, including castles and royal residences. The pattern on this example has been created by inlaying white decoration into the surface of the tile.

Tile

These fragments of a tile were once part of a highly decorated floor at Chertsey Abbey, Surrey. Pavements of decorated ceramic tiles were a medieval innovation. They were used to add richness and splendour to great churches initially but they were subsequently used in secular contexts, including castles and royal residences. The pattern on this example has been created by inlaying white decoration into the surface of the tile.

tile; floor tile  Accession number: 84.8/5 Production date: Early Medieval; mid-late 13th century Material: ceramic; earthenware Measurements: T 21 mm; L 116 mm; W 115 mm Museum Section: Medieval Summary: Floor tile, Westminster; horizontal zig-zag.

tile; floor tile Accession number: 84.8/5 Production date: Early Medieval; mid-late 13th century Material: ceramic; earthenware Measurements: T 21 mm; L 116 mm; W 115 mm Museum Section: Medieval Summary: Floor tile, Westminster; horizontal zig-zag.

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