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A natural killer cell (NK cell, yellow) of the immune system attacking a cancer cell (red).  (Photo courtesy of Prof. Dr. Rupert Handgretinger, Clinic for Children’s and Youth Medicine, University Hospital of Tübingen, Gemany; with permission of Eye of Science)

A natural killer cell (NK cell, yellow) of the immune system attacking a cancer cell (red). (Photo courtesy of Prof. Dr. Rupert Handgretinger, Clinic for Children’s and Youth Medicine, University Hospital of Tübingen, Gemany; with permission of Eye of Science)

The Cell (January 2011) How can cells grow and develop to form complex creatures? In this issue we explore the secrets of the cell. Our free poster shows a typical animal cell and reveals some surprising statistics. Order a copy or download [PDF].

The Cell (January 2011) How can cells grow and develop to form complex creatures? In this issue we explore the secrets of the cell. Our free poster shows a typical animal cell and reveals some surprising statistics. Order a copy or download [PDF].

✯ Nerve cells and glial cells, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The nerve cells have small cell bodies (orange) and fine extensions called axons and dendrites (brown). The glial cells have large cell bodies (blue) with thicker extensions (pale green). Neurons are responsible for passing information around the central nervous system (CNS) and from the CNS to the rest of the body. Glial cells are nervous system cells that provide the neurons with structural support and…

✯ Nerve cells and glial cells, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). The nerve cells have small cell bodies (orange) and fine extensions called axons and dendrites (brown). The glial cells have large cell bodies (blue) with thicker extensions (pale green). Neurons are responsible for passing information around the central nervous system (CNS) and from the CNS to the rest of the body. Glial cells are nervous system cells that provide the neurons with structural support and…

Image of the Week - December 16, 2013  CIL:39057 -  http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39057  Colorized scanning electron micrograph of the components of a blood clot.    Kevin MacKenzie  (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Image of the Week - December 16, 2013 CIL:39057 - http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39057 Colorized scanning electron micrograph of the components of a blood clot. Kevin MacKenzie (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)

Comparison of a human red blood cell ,erythrocyte,, a white blood cell ,leukocyte,, and a platelet ,thrombocyte,. SEM X2500.

Comparison of a human red blood cell ,erythrocyte,, a white blood cell ,leukocyte,, and a platelet ,thrombocyte,. SEM X2500.

Blood clot. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a blood clot from the inner wall of the left ventricle of a human heart. Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are trapped within a fibrin protein mesh (cream). The fibrin mesh is formed in response to chemicals secreted by platelets (pink), fragments of white blood cells. Clots are formed in response to cardiovascular disease or injuries to blood vessels. Connective tissue (orange) is also seen

Blood clot. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a blood clot from the inner wall of the left ventricle of a human heart. Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are trapped within a fibrin protein mesh (cream). The fibrin mesh is formed in response to chemicals secreted by platelets (pink), fragments of white blood cells. Clots are formed in response to cardiovascular disease or injuries to blood vessels. Connective tissue (orange) is also seen

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