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SylvaC pottery vases 4693 based on Winged Bull designed from Persia, Mesopotamia, Assyria

SylvaC pottery vases 4693 based on Winged Bull designed from Persia, Mesopotamia, Assyria

UR: Great Lyre with Bull's Head, Front Panel from the sound box. Wood with shell inlaid w/bitumen. ca 3550-2400 BC, Iraq

UR: Great Lyre with Bull's Head, Front Panel from the sound box. Wood with shell inlaid w/bitumen. ca 3550-2400 BC, Iraq

Mesopotamia Fast Finisher - Coloring Page (Mount on Cardstock and hang in the hall for extra credit_

Mesopotamia Fast Finisher - Coloring Page (Mount on Cardstock and hang in the hall for extra credit_

Assyria (Akkadian: Aššur), was a Semitic Akkadian kingdom, existing as a nation state from the late 25th or early–24th century BC until 605 BC.[1] Assyria was centered on the Upper Tigris river, in northern Mesopotamia (present day Northern Iraq). The Assyrians came to rule powerful empires at several times. It was named for its original capital, the ancient city of Aššur (Akkadian:  Aššūrāyu; Aramaic: אתור Aṯur; Hebrew: אַשּׁוּר Aššûr; Arabic: آشور Āšūr).

Assyria (Akkadian: Aššur), was a Semitic Akkadian kingdom, existing as a nation state from the late 25th or early–24th century BC until 605 BC.[1] Assyria was centered on the Upper Tigris river, in northern Mesopotamia (present day Northern Iraq). The Assyrians came to rule powerful empires at several times. It was named for its original capital, the ancient city of Aššur (Akkadian: Aššūrāyu; Aramaic: אתור Aṯur; Hebrew: אַשּׁוּר Aššûr; Arabic: آشور Āšūr).

Winged human-headed bull  Neo-Assyrian Period, reign of Sargon II (721-705 BC)  Khorsabad, ancient Dur Sharrukin, Assyria, Iraq  High relief and sculpture in the round; gypseous alabaster  Louvre Museum

Winged human-headed bull Neo-Assyrian Period, reign of Sargon II (721-705 BC) Khorsabad, ancient Dur Sharrukin, Assyria, Iraq High relief and sculpture in the round; gypseous alabaster Louvre Museum

Stone tablet engraved with pictographic writing from the Mesopotamian city of Kish (Iraq), dating from 3500 BC It is probably the oldest known traces of writing; and it consists of pictograms that represent heads, feet, hands, numbers and

Stone tablet engraved with pictographic writing from the Mesopotamian city of Kish (Iraq), dating from 3500 BC It is probably the oldest known traces of writing; and it consists of pictograms that represent heads, feet, hands, numbers and

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