Explore Indus Valley Civilization, Wood Glass and more!

Explore related topics

Terracotta pottery unearthed at the 4500 year old excavation site in Farmana, Haryana. The site dates back to the Harappa age and has thrown up human settlement and a burial site. #Photos #India

Terracotta pottery unearthed at the 4500 year old excavation site in Farmana, Haryana. The site dates back to the Harappa age and has thrown up human settlement and a burial site.

Indus Valley Terracotta Figurine of a Fertility Goddess - LO.567  Origin: Pakistan/Western India  Circa: 2600 BC to 1900 BC

Indus Valley Terracotta Figurine of a Fertility Goddess - Origin: Pakistan/Western India Circa: 2600 BC to 1900 BC. Interesting the headdress closely resembles the headresses of the plains indians of North America.

Indus valley civilisation found to date to nearly 7000bce, 2000 years older than previously thought

Harappan Civilization 2000 years older then previously thought

Bowl Decorated with a Procession of Women Date: ca. 5th–6th century Culture: Pakistan (Bajaur Valley) Medium: Terracotta with ink

The figural and decorative black painting was done when the slip was still wet, giving a distinct, slightly blurry effect that is characteristic of ceramic ware produced at this time in the Bajaur Valley, at the Afghanistan border

The Indus Valley Civilization has yielded evidence of dentistry being practiced as far back as 7000 BC. This earliest form of dentistry involved curing tooth related disorders with bow drills operated, perhaps, by skilled bead craftsmen. The reconstruction of this ancient form of dentistry showed that the methods used were reliable and effective. Cavities of 3.5 mm depth with concentric grooves indicate use of a drill tool. The age of the teeth has been estimated at 9000 years.

In archaeologists studying the remains of two men from Mehrgarh made the discovery that the people of the Indus Valley Civilization, from the early Harappan periods, had knowledge of proto-dentistry.

Sumerian Cuneiform circa 2500 BC. Clay tablet with summary account of silver for the governor. From Shuruppak or Abu Salabikh, Iraq, circa 2,500 BCE. British Museum, London. BM 15826 In 3500 BC the Sumerians had a well developed writing system. Possibly the first writing system. Initial over 2000 symbols, pictograms and drawings were used.

Summary account of silver for the governor written in Sumerian Cuneiform on a clay tablet. From Shuruppak, Iraq, circa 2500 BCE. The British Museum

Statue of the high priest of the Indus River Valley.

Harappan, ca." The central ornament worn on the forehead of the famous "priest-king" sculpture from Mohenjo-daro appears to represent an eye bead, possibly made of gold with steatite inlay in the center.

Pinterest
Search