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Bashkir/Bashkort (Башҡорт теле / Başqort tele) is a member of the Kypchak-Bolgar group of the Turkic languages. It is spoken by about 1.5 million people mainly in the Republic of Bashkortostan, in other parts of the Russian Federation, including Chelyabinsk, Orenburg, Perm, Kurgan, Samara, Saratov, Sverdlovsk, Tyumen regions, and also in Tatarstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan. (...)

Bashkir/Bashkort (Башҡорт теле / Başqort tele) is a member of the Kypchak-Bolgar group of the Turkic languages. It is spoken by about 1.5 million people mainly in the Republic of Bashkortostan, in other parts of the Russian Federation, including Chelyabinsk, Orenburg, Perm, Kurgan, Samara, Saratov, Sverdlovsk, Tyumen regions, and also in Tatarstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan. (...)

Erzya (Эрзянь кель) is a Mordvinic language spoken by about half a milllion people in the Republic of Mordovia, and other parts of the Russia Federation. There are also Erzya speakers in Armenia, Estonia, Kazakhstan and other parts of Central Asia. Erzya and Moksha (мокшень кяль), a closely related though mutually unintelligible language, are collectively known as Mordvin. These languages have co-official status with Russian in the Republic of Mordovia. (...)

Details of Erzya, a Mordvinic language spoken mainly in the Mordvin Republic of the Russia Federation by about people.

Adyghe (адыгэбзэ) is a North West Caucasian language spoken by about 300,000 people mainly in the Republic of Adygea in the Russian Federation. Adyghe, which is also known as West Circassian, is also spoken in Turkey, Israel and Jordan. (...)

Adyghe (адыгэбзэ) is a North West Caucasian language spoken by about people mainly in the Republic of Adygea in the Russian Federation. Adyghe, which is also known as West Circassian, is also spoken in Turkey, Israel and Jordan.

Abkhaz (аҧсуа бызшәа) is a North West Caucasian language related to Abaza, Adyghe, Kabardian and Ubykh. About 100,000 people speak Abkhaz in Abkhazia, an autonomous republic within Georgia. There are also Abkhaz speakers, perhaps hundreds of thousands, in Turkey, the republic of Adjara in Georgia, Syria, Jordan, Germany and the USA. (...)

Details of Abkhaz, a North West Caucasian language spoken mainly in Abkhazia, an autonomous republic within Georgia.

Teleut (Тэлэңгэт) is a variety of Southern Altay, a Turkic language spoken by about 2,500 people in the Altai Republic in Western Siberia in the Russian Federation. The Teleut people call themselves тэлэңэт (Telenget) or тэлэңут (Telengut). (,,,)

Teleut (Тэлэңгэт) is a variety of Southern Altay, a Turkic language spoken by about people in the Altai Republic in Western Siberia in the Russian Federation. The Teleut people call themselves тэлэңэт (Telenget) or тэлэңут (Telengut).

Ukrainian (Українська) is an Eastern Slavonic language closely related to Russian and Belarusian. It is spoken by about 51 million people in Ukraine (Україна) and in many other countries, including Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Brazil, Canada, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Paraguay, Poland, Romania, Russia and Slovakia. (...)

Ukrainian is an Eastern Slavic language spoken mainly in Ukraine by about 51 million people.

Xibe is a Tungusic language spoken in Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in north west China by about 30,000 people. It is closely related to Manchu, though the Xibe people consider themselves a separte ethnic group. The Xibe were moved to the region in 1764 by the Ch'ing emperor Qianlong. The language is also known as Sibe, Xibo or Sibo. (...)

Xibe is a Tungusic language spoken in Xinjiang in north west China by about people. It is written the Xibe alphabet, a version of the Manchu alphabet.

Hittite (nešili) was spoken north-central Anatolia (part of modern Turkey) and is generally classified as belonging to the Anatolian branch of Indo-European languages. Written records of Hittite date from between the 16th and 13th centuries BC, and it is the earliest Indo-European to appear in writing. (...)

Hittite was an Anatolian language spoken in central parts of Anatolia (modern day Turkey) until about BC.

Udi (удин муз / udin muz) is a member of the Lezgian (southern) branch of the Northeast Caucasian languages. It is spoken by about 8,000 people in parts of Azerbaijan, Russia, Georgia and Armenia, with the majority of speakers in the Azerbaijani village of Nij in the Qabala district. There are also quite a few Udi speakers in villages in Tavush Province in northeastern Armenia. (...)

Details of Udi, a North East Caucasian language spoken in parts of Azerbaijan, Russia, Georgia and Armenia by about people.

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