Tomq
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#3dgraffiti #glowinthedarkgraffiti #bodyart #graffiti #bodypainting #graffitigirls #graffitiongirls #hotgirls #sexybodyart #streetartgirls

#3dgraffiti #glowinthedarkgraffiti #bodyart #graffiti #bodypainting #graffitigirls #graffitiongirls #hotgirls #sexybodyart #streetartgirls

Inferno Giovanni da Modena, ‘Inferno’ (Detail), c. 1410 I don’t recall ever seeing this in Art History class, because I’d have been pretty traumatized, and I think I would have probably remembered that later, after years of needless therapy.

Inferno Giovanni da Modena, ‘Inferno’ (Detail), c. 1410 I don’t recall ever seeing this in Art History class, because I’d have been pretty traumatized, and I think I would have probably remembered that later, after years of needless therapy.

It’s not unusual to read the texts with the titles “Garden of Earthly Delights: A Mirror for Modern Times?” or “Hieronymus Bosch: The Mirror of Man”; they easily fall …

It’s not unusual to read the texts with the titles “Garden of Earthly Delights: A Mirror for Modern Times?” or “Hieronymus Bosch: The Mirror of Man”; they easily fall …

Monsters

Lucas Cranach the Elder after Jheronimus Bosch - The Last Judgment.

Hellmouth is the entrance to Hell envisaged as the gaping mouth of a huge monster, an image which first appears in Anglo-Saxon art, and then spread all over Europe, remaining very common in depictions of the Last Judgment and Harrowing of Hell until the end of the Middle Ages, and still sometimes used during the Renaissance and after. It enjoyed something of a revival in polemical popular prints after the Protestant Reformation, when figures from the opposite side would be shown disappearing

Hellmouth is the entrance to Hell envisaged as the gaping mouth of a huge monster, an image which first appears in Anglo-Saxon art, and then spread all over Europe, remaining very common in depictions of the Last Judgment and Harrowing of Hell until the end of the Middle Ages, and still sometimes used during the Renaissance and after. It enjoyed something of a revival in polemical popular prints after the Protestant Reformation, when figures from the opposite side would be shown disappearing