BUSH TWINE Bilum with natural pigment dye  Handmade by the Omie Tribe of Papau New Guinea

Bilums from Papua New Guinea, at Gather. Bilums are handmade bags made out of bush twine (harvested plants & reeds spun into yarn), then dyed with bush fruits, bark and nuts. This is the real gathering culture.

This traditional bilum has been modernised by blending plain and coloured natural fibres to create a unique pattern. The 'bush' rope used to weave the bilum is made from 100% natural fibre using the traditional technique of hand rolling plant fibres into twine over the knee. The process is carried out by women who then use natural materials such as berries, leaves and muds to dye the fibres, before weaving them into bilums of many different sizes and patterns. Each pattern tells...

This traditional bilum has been modernised by blending plain and coloured natural fibres to create a unique pattern. The 'bush' rope used to we.

Bilum bag, New Guinea Highlands. These bags are used by both men for anything from carrying babies and belongings to catching fish. Some bags have ceremonial significance such as mourning or coming of age. This particular bag is richly decorated with feathers, different type of shells and glass beads and probably belonged to an important figure such as a great hunter, warrior or sorcerer.

Bilum bag, New Guinea Highlands. These bags are used by both men for anything from carrying babies and belongings to catching fish. Some bags have ceremonial significance such as mourning or coming of age. This particular bag is richly decorated with feathers, different type of shells and glass beads and probably belonged to an important figure such as a great hunter, warrior or sorcerer.

Bilum Bag   http://pngbilum.isilinkit.com/bilum.html

Bilum Bag http://pngbilum.isilinkit.com/bilum.html

Bolivian Twined Bag. This handsome shoulder bag is made with a bromeliad fiber which is currently cultivated by the Ayoreo women of  the Puesto Paz community in Bolivia. Each bag is unique and patterns vary from bag to bag. The bags are traditional and represent the seven clans of the Ayoreo indigenous people. $140.00 || ClothRoads.com

This handsome shoulder bag is made with a bromeliad fiber…

Who: Benjiman Where: Port Moresby  “Where are you going?”  “I’m on my way back from meeting my Father for breakfast.”  “Where is your bilum from?” “It was gifted from a friend who is from the Wigman tribe in Hela Province.”  “How long have you had your bilum for?” “I have this one for 2 years.”  “What do you like best about your bilum?” “It’s just the right size for carrying my food and snacks.”

Who: Benjiman Where: Port Moresby “Where are you going?” “I’m on my way back from meeting my Father for breakfast.” “Where is your bilum from?” “It was gifted from a friend who is from the Wigman tribe in Hela Province.” “How long have you had your bilum for?” “I have this one for 2 years.” “What do you like best about your bilum?” “It’s just the right size for carrying my food and snacks.”

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