For over 100 years, people have been drawn to national parks by the promise of getting 'back to nature'. Australia has some of the oldest national parks in the world (the first park was created in 1879 just south of Sydney) and has more than any other country. They were distinctive for their emphasis on recreational use more than the protection of natural wonder.

For over 100 years, people have been drawn to national parks by the promise of getting 'back to nature'. Australia has some of the oldest national parks in the world (the first park was created in 1879 just south of Sydney) and has more than any other country. They were distinctive for their emphasis on recreational use more than the protection of natural wonder.

Over 500 ancient lamps, ranging in date from the late second millennium BC to the early second millennium AD, are kept in New Zealand's public collections. They have been acquired by various means, but most of them have been donated since the latter part of the nineteenth century by businessmen, travellers, and members of the armed forces who have served in the Mediterranean either during First or Second World War.

Over 500 ancient lamps, ranging in date from the late second millennium BC to the early second millennium AD, are kept in New Zealand's public collections. They have been acquired by various means, but most of them have been donated since the latter part of the nineteenth century by businessmen, travellers, and members of the armed forces who have served in the Mediterranean either during First or Second World War.

Established in 1919, 'The Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (CVA)' series brings together the known holdings of Greek and Italian pottery held in museums and private collections around the world into a standard format.

Established in 1919, 'The Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum (CVA)' series brings together the known holdings of Greek and Italian pottery held in museums and private collections around the world into a standard format.

Melbourne grew during the 19th century from its fledgling roots into a global metropolitan centre, and was home to many people from a range of social and cultural backgrounds. The Martin family arrived in Melbourne in 1839 and soon established themselves at the genteel Viewbank estate near Heidelberg.

Melbourne grew during the 19th century from its fledgling roots into a global metropolitan centre, and was home to many people from a range of social and cultural backgrounds. The Martin family arrived in Melbourne in 1839 and soon established themselves at the genteel Viewbank estate near Heidelberg.

Very few pieces of documentary evidence, along with archaeological records from one colonial-period Chinese fish-curing camp in Victoria, remain. They reveal a fascinating story of how Chinese fish curers successfully dominated Australia's fishing industry; how they lived, worked, organised themselves, participated in colonial society, and the reasons why they suddenly disappeared.

Very few pieces of documentary evidence, along with archaeological records from one colonial-period Chinese fish-curing camp in Victoria, remain. They reveal a fascinating story of how Chinese fish curers successfully dominated Australia's fishing industry; how they lived, worked, organised themselves, participated in colonial society, and the reasons why they suddenly disappeared.

The archaeological assemblage from the Hyde Park Barracks is one of the largest, most comprehensive and best preserved collections of artefacts from any 19th-century institution in the world.   Concealed for up to 160 years in the cavities between floorboards and ceilings, the assemblage is a unique archaeological record of institutional confinement, especially of women.

The archaeological assemblage from the Hyde Park Barracks is one of the largest, most comprehensive and best preserved collections of artefacts from any 19th-century institution in the world. Concealed for up to 160 years in the cavities between floorboards and ceilings, the assemblage is a unique archaeological record of institutional confinement, especially of women.

Using archival research and archaeological evidence, the book examines the history and operation of this almost forgotten industry on the remote maritime frontier of the British Empire and the role of the whalers in the history of early contact between Europeans and Aboriginal people.

Using archival research and archaeological evidence, the book examines the history and operation of this almost forgotten industry on the remote maritime frontier of the British Empire and the role of the whalers in the history of early contact between Europeans and Aboriginal people.

The 1840s military settlement of Victoria established at Port Essington, the Northern Territory, was the end point of Ludwig Leichhardt's epic journey in 1844-45. It was excavated in 1966 by Jim Allen.

The 1840s military settlement of Victoria established at Port Essington, the Northern Territory, was the end point of Ludwig Leichhardt's epic journey in 1844-45. It was excavated in 1966 by Jim Allen.


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Despite several landmarks across the state bearing his name, John Hunter, the second governor of New South Wales, remains somewhat of an enigma. http://purl.library.usyd.edu.au/sup/9781920899196

Despite several landmarks across the state bearing his name, John Hunter, the second governor of New South Wales, remains somewhat of an enigma. http://purl.library.usyd.edu.au/sup/9781920899196

Dickens had a keen interest in Australia and fortuitously began publishing the periodical at a transitional moment, just before the heady days of the 1850s gold rush set the world ablaze. The discovery of gold drove a period of mass immigration, expansion into the hinterlands, and caused radical economic and social changes in an emerging nation.

Dickens had a keen interest in Australia and fortuitously began publishing the periodical at a transitional moment, just before the heady days of the 1850s gold rush set the world ablaze. The discovery of gold drove a period of mass immigration, expansion into the hinterlands, and caused radical economic and social changes in an emerging nation.

This volume contains stories on the experiences of convicts. Beginning with court processes and sentencing in Britain, the stories provide an insight into the conditions of prisoners on board ships to Australia and in prisons, and the range of treatments received by convicts until their conditional or final pardon.

This volume contains stories on the experiences of convicts. Beginning with court processes and sentencing in Britain, the stories provide an insight into the conditions of prisoners on board ships to Australia and in prisons, and the range of treatments received by convicts until their conditional or final pardon.

Charles Dickens is little celebrated as a journalist, yet his career spanned nearly 40 years. Starting as a court reporter, parliamentary newspaper columnist and theatre critic, he developed an instinct for injustice, humbug and charade. For 20 years he edited his own weekly journal, Household Words, later known as All the Year Round, publishing articles and stories designed to be interesting, entertaining, and educational.

Charles Dickens is little celebrated as a journalist, yet his career spanned nearly 40 years. Starting as a court reporter, parliamentary newspaper columnist and theatre critic, he developed an instinct for injustice, humbug and charade. For 20 years he edited his own weekly journal, Household Words, later known as All the Year Round, publishing articles and stories designed to be interesting, entertaining, and educational.

Of the nearly 3000 articles published in Household Words, some 100 related to Australia and have been collected in this anthology. Dickens saw Australia offering opportunities for England's poor and downtrodden to make a new start and a brighter future for themselves; optimism reflected in many of the articles.

Of the nearly 3000 articles published in Household Words, some 100 related to Australia and have been collected in this anthology. Dickens saw Australia offering opportunities for England's poor and downtrodden to make a new start and a brighter future for themselves; optimism reflected in many of the articles.

Lucy Chesser explores the persistent recurrence of cross-dressing and gender inversion within Australian cultural life. The book compares and contrasts sustained life-long impersonations where women lived, worked and sometimes married as men, with other forms of cross-dressing such as public masquerades, cross-dressing on the stage, and the prosecution of men who sought sexual encounters while disguised as women.

Lucy Chesser explores the persistent recurrence of cross-dressing and gender inversion within Australian cultural life. The book compares and contrasts sustained life-long impersonations where women lived, worked and sometimes married as men, with other forms of cross-dressing such as public masquerades, cross-dressing on the stage, and the prosecution of men who sought sexual encounters while disguised as women.

Invasion to Embassy challenges the conventional view of Aboriginal politics to present a bold new account of Aboriginal responses to invasion and dispossession in New South Wales. At the core of these responses has been land: as a concrete goal, but also as a rallying cry, a call for justice and a focal point for identity.

Invasion to Embassy challenges the conventional view of Aboriginal politics to present a bold new account of Aboriginal responses to invasion and dispossession in New South Wales. At the core of these responses has been land: as a concrete goal, but also as a rallying cry, a call for justice and a focal point for identity.

'Letters to Australia' is a collection of Julius Stone's radio talks, originally broadcast by the ABC between 1942 and 1972.

'Letters to Australia' is a collection of Julius Stone's radio talks, originally broadcast by the ABC between 1942 and 1972.

Camouflage Australia tells a once secret and little known story of how the Australian government accepted the advice of zoologist William John Dakin and seconded the country's leading artists and designers, including Max Dupain and Frank Hinder, to deploy optical tricks and visual illusions for civilian and military protection. Drawing on previously unpublished photographs and documents, Camouflage Australia exposes the story of fraught collaborations between civilian and military personnel

Camouflage Australia tells a once secret and little known story of how the Australian government accepted the advice of zoologist William John Dakin and seconded the country's leading artists and designers, including Max Dupain and Frank Hinder, to deploy optical tricks and visual illusions for civilian and military protection. Drawing on previously unpublished photographs and documents, Camouflage Australia exposes the story of fraught collaborations between civilian and military personnel

The contributors to this book reveal different approaches to creating a colony. Using the rich collections of the Mitchell Library, the authors go beyond the traditional sources of history, highlighting the personal stories revealed through family letters, and creative interaction with the landscape through poetry and drawings.

The contributors to this book reveal different approaches to creating a colony. Using the rich collections of the Mitchell Library, the authors go beyond the traditional sources of history, highlighting the personal stories revealed through family letters, and creative interaction with the landscape through poetry and drawings.

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