The Penguin History of New Zealand by Michael King: New Zealand was the last country in the world to be discovered and settled by humankind.  It was also the first to introduce full democracy.  Between those events, and in the century that followed the franchise, the movements and the conflicts of human history have been played out more intensively and more rapidly in New Zealand that anywhere else on Earth.

The Penguin History of New Zealand by Michael King: New Zealand was the last country in the world to be discovered and settled by humankind. It was also the first to introduce full democracy. Between those events, and in the century that followed the franchise, the movements and the conflicts of human history have been played out more intensively and more rapidly in New Zealand that anywhere else on Earth.

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1820s Gable figure (tekoteko), Maori people, Te Arawa region, New Zealand.  Wood, paint.   Metropolitan Museum of Art (PD-old)

1820s Gable figure (tekoteko), Maori people, Te Arawa region, New Zealand. Wood, paint. Metropolitan Museum of Art (PD-old)

Tooi, a New Zealand chief. Painted and presented by James Barry Esq[ui]re.

Tooi, a New Zealand chief. Painted and presented by James Barry Esq[ui]re.

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Miramar or Whataitai (Hataitai) in Maori times. Postcard by Hector McLeod & Co, No 3. Miramar series. 1907.  Reference number: Eph-A-MAORI-1907-01, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

Miramar or Whataitai (Hataitai) in Maori times. Postcard by Hector McLeod & Co, No 3. Miramar series. 1907. Reference number: Eph-A-MAORI-1907-01, Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand.

June Grant  (Maori: Te Arawa, Tuwharetoa, Tuhourangi, Ngati Wahiao) - Ruahine Woman of Two Peoples , 2001, acrylic on canvas. 30" x 40"

June Grant (Maori: Te Arawa, Tuwharetoa, Tuhourangi, Ngati Wahiao) - Ruahine Woman of Two Peoples , 2001, acrylic on canvas. 30" x 40"

The Beating Heart tells the history of the Te Arawa people. Maori Non-fiction 993.423z OMA

The Beating Heart tells the history of the Te Arawa people. Maori Non-fiction 993.423z OMA

Te Rangikaheke wrote about most aspects of Maori culture, including language, genealogies, and legends, before 1854. The Library holds copies of his manuscripts. Visit us on the 2nd floor to explore these vivid accounts of Te Arawa history.

Te Rangikaheke wrote about most aspects of Maori culture, including language, genealogies, and legends, before 1854. The Library holds copies of his manuscripts. Visit us on the 2nd floor to explore these vivid accounts of Te Arawa history.

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