Taniko

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Taniko weaving tutorial Part 1 - YouTube

Taniko weaving tutorial Part 1 - YouTube

Taniko weaving tutorial Part 2 - YouTube

Taniko weaving tutorial Part 2 - YouTube

Taniko Weaving Tutorial - YouTube

Taniko Weaving Tutorial - YouTube

Taniko weaving tutorial Part 2 - YouTube

Taniko weaving tutorial Part 2 - YouTube

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antílopes tapiz algodón,lana,madera taaniko,

antílopes tapiz algodón,lana,madera taaniko,

) Peru, British Museum, # x [Oblique counter-twining. Probably loop braided - cf Mary Frame. Incredibly intricate flat braided textiles were produced in pre-Columbian cultures, but disappeared by the time of the Incas.

"Weft twining along with its related structures is an ancient basket and textile construction that is still practiced in many cultures throughout the world." In-depth study of this technique.

"Weft twining along with its related structures is an ancient basket and textile construction that is still practiced in many cultures throughout the world." In-depth study of this technique.

Twined basketry bag, probably used for storage of dried roots or berries. Plain twining with warps and wefts of willow bark. The design is comprised of horizontal bands of zigzags in overlay twining of corn husk. Southern Plateau culture area. Creator: Southern Plateau culture area Creation Date: 1880-1920 - Washington State Historical Society

Twined basketry bag, probably used for storage of dried roots or berries. Plain twining with warps and wefts of willow bark. The design is comprised of horizontal bands of zigzags in overlay twining of corn husk. Southern Plateau culture area. Creator: Southern Plateau culture area Creation Date: 1880-1920 - Washington State Historical Society

Montagnard style weft twining.  Wefts become warps -I want to try this.

The Weaving Melting Pot

Montagnard style weft twining. Wefts become warps -I want to try this.

el telaret: Telar Wayuu, Colombia...

el telaret: Telar Wayuu, Colombia...

The grand design of the largest part of the hupil (the bodice, neck-border, and sleeves have different traditional designs) represents time. The sun pausing at zenith is symbolically represented as a grand diamond, with the 4 sacred directions smaller ones. East (dawn) is above, West (evening) below. Pattern repetitions across the row means the sun passing across the sky, under the earth (which is metaphysical not just underground), and re-emerging at dawn the next day. ..

The grand design of the largest part of the hupil (the bodice, neck-border, and sleeves have different traditional designs) represents time. The sun pausing at zenith is symbolically represented as a grand diamond, with the 4 sacred directions smaller ones. East (dawn) is above, West (evening) below. Pattern repetitions across the row means the sun passing across the sky, under the earth (which is metaphysical not just underground), and re-emerging at dawn the next day. ..

I came across this great art project on Etsy for weaving your own Ojo de Dios. These stunning, brightly colored “Eyes of God” are made from simple sticks and colored yarn. All photos an…

DIY: Weaving a Complex Ojo de Dios

I came across this great art project on Etsy for weaving your own Ojo de Dios. These stunning, brightly colored “Eyes of God” are made from simple sticks and colored yarn. All photos an…

The Mayan Women in the rural area of Guatemala still weave the same way their mothers, grandmothers and great grandmothers have done for hundreds of years.  They use a Lienso, a back-strap loom to weave cloth that is typically 12 to 24 inches wide.  Woman in San Jorge

Back-Strap Loom Weaving

The Mayan Women in the rural area of Guatemala still weave the same way their mothers, grandmothers and great grandmothers have done for hundreds of years. They use a Lienso, a back-strap loom to weave cloth that is typically 12 to 24 inches wide. Woman in San Jorge

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