A view, supposedly looking back from the captured Turkish trenches at Lone Pine, taken in September 1915, well after the battle of 6-9 August 1915. Clearly, a lot of the dead still remain unburied which can be accounted for by the fact that it would have been too dangerous to go out, in full view of the enemy, to retrieve the bodies. It was in this area after the war that the Lone Pine cemetery and memorial were constructed. This photograph was given to the Australian War Memorial by…
A pile of Australian soldiers' equipment photographed in Brown's Dip behind Lone Pine on 10 August 1915, the day after the end of the battle. This melancholy image suggests the large number of Australian dead and wounded suffered at Lone Pine, somewhere in the region of 2,000 men. One of the great tragedies of the battle was the way in which narrow trenches became clogged with the wounded, the dying and the dead. Sergeant Cyril Lawrence of the Australian Engineers was in Brown's Dip on 7…
Australian soldiers in captured Turkish trenches at Lone Pine after the battle of 6-9 August 1915. This famous image, also taken by Australian journalist Philip Schuler (see caption for previous image), shows Captain Leslie Morshead, 2nd Battalion (New South Wales) looking up at the dead lying on the lip of the trench and Private James Bryant, 8th Battalion (Victoria), standing looking at the camera. In World War II, Morshead went on to command the 9th Australian Division in the Middle East…
A scene in the trenches of Lone Pine on 8 August 1915. The photographer is unknown but the image conveys a sense of the losses sustained by both sides in the three day battle. It was given to the Australian War Memorial by a Major C Jackson and this may be the Lieutenant Clarence Jackson, who sailed with the 1st Battalion (New South Wales) on 18 October 1914 from Sydney on the troopship Afric. Bean writes of the actions of Captain Cyril Sasse, 1st Battalion, who during a lull in the fighting…
This wooden cross was erected in one of the Gallipoli battlefield cemeteries by soldiers of the 2nd Brigade, AIF, who fought at the Battle of Lone Pine, 6-9 August 1915. The location is not given in the original AWM caption but from the landscape it could be Shrapnel Gully cemetery or possibly Brown's Dip which lay in the gully behind the Lone Pine plateau. The graves at Brown's Dip were removed to Lone Pine Cemetery after the war.  The date on the cross - 7/8/15 - is interesting. The only…
This photograph was taken on 9 August 1915 and shows men of the 1st Battalion (New South Wales) awaiting relief after virtually three days in action. The man with the bandage to his eyes is Captain Cecil Sasse, of Sydney, New South Wales. Sasse was awarded a DSO (Distinguished Service Order) for his courage and leadership during the Lone Pine battle. In part, his DSO read:  For conspicuous gallantry and determination during the attack on Lone Pine, Gallipoli Peninsula, on the 6th-7th August…
In many respects Lone Pine was a battle of the 'bombs'. The Turks, according to official historian Charles Bean, seemed to have an 'inexhaustible supply' of their cricket-ball style bombes and they had been well trained in throwing them. The Anzacs had come ashore without any kind of 'bomb' so a 'bomb factory' was hastily established near Anzac Headquarters at the beach. In this British official photograph, 'bombs' are being made by stuffing old jam tins with pieces of Turkish shell and…
Australian soldiers relax in the trenches at Lone Pine on 10 August 1915, the day after the end of the battle. Notice the pine logs roofing the trench. Some of these were broken open by the Anzac bombardment of the Turkish trenches on 6 August and in the initial attack at 5.30 pm some Australian soldiers jumped through these holes into the Turkish positions. Others entered the Turkish front line through gaps that had been left in this head cover. At that stage, fortunately for them, many…
The barricaded end of a captured Turkish trench at Lone Pine after the battle on 10 August 1915. This image illustrates well the manner in which, after a portion of trench had been seized by the Australians, a new front line was created by the erection of a barricade in the trench itself constructed of sandbags and other material to hand. The Australian war Memorial's caption to this image states that the Australian soldier at the barricade was looking through a loophole down a Turkish…
Australian soldiers in a captured Turkish trench at Lone Pine on 6 August 1915. The man on the left is Captain Cecil Sasse, 1st Battalion (New South Wales), of Sydney, New South Wales. In the initial attack at Lone Pine at 5.30 pm on 6 August 1915, the 1st Battalion was in reserve and the enemy trenches were rushed by the other infantry units of the 1st Brigade - the 2nd, 3rd and 4th Battalions. Elements of the 1st Battalion were called forward into the captured trenches at about 6.20 pm and…

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Australian soldiers in captured Turkish trenches at Lone Pine after the battle of 6-9 August 1915. This famous image, also taken by Australian journalist Philip Schuler (see caption for previous image), shows Captain Leslie Morshead, 2nd Battalion (New South Wales) looking up at the dead lying on the lip of the trench and Private James Bryant, 8th Battalion (Victoria), standing looking at the camera. In World War II, Morshead went on to command the 9th Australian Division in the Middle East…
Bravery Awards at Gallipoli | Lone Pine
Portrait of 11272 Private Gilbert Williams who was born at Gonelie, NSW, and who enlisted in the 20th Reinforcements to the 3rd Light Horse Regiment on 3 April 1917. He was discharged at the Mitcham Camp, SA on 4 September 1917, "having been found medically unfit for further service (not due to misconduct)". (This quote is from his service file held at the National Archives of Australia) His family claim he was discharged because he was black.
Two soldiers of the Canterbury Battalion, New Zealand Brigade, in a trench at Gallipoli, May 1915
WWI Soldier frozen in death
The original Lone Pine  "In the vicinity of the Lone Pine Memorial there stood on 25 April 1915, in Bean’s words, a ‘single dwarf pine tree’. Within days the tree had been shot away but not before it gave its name to the position, Lone Pine. Within months, Lone Pine had entered Australia’s national story as the site of one of the bloodiest and hardest fought actions of the campaign – the Battle of Lone Pine." http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/2visiting/walk_08lonepine.html
Diggers at Anzac Cove.
Poppy, Anzac Cove, Gallipoli, Turkey
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